Porsche 924

Porsche 924 is sports car edition produced by Audi company on behalf of the Porsche AG of Germany. The average price of a Porsche 924 car is $25,246. It’s an old model of Porsche but still have much worth among car lovers.

Porsche

:eight_pointed_black_star: History of Porsche 924

Introduced in 1976, the Porsche 924 was created to serve as an entry-level Porsche, sitting beneath the 911 and succeeding the contentious 914. As with the latter, there were initial reservations about its “Porscheness” due to its heavy reliance on Volkswagen/Audi components, which was exacerbated by the fact that it was built at Audi’s Neckarsulm facility near Stuttgart.

The 924, on the other hand, dispelled any worries with performance and handling befitting of the Porsche badge. Along with advancing Porsche’s fashion, it eventually became a commercial success, accounting for 60% of the company’s sales and enabling Porsche to overcome its mid-life crisis and establish financial stability.

While the Porsche 924 was not the finest sports car of its era, it was undoubtedly the most influential production coupe of the 1970s and 1980s. Its emphasis on graceful engineering prompted a slew of competitors. No other automobile in its sector was as well-built and tuned as this one. None came close to matching its comprehensiveness as a fun-to-drive, practical coupe.

This car was instrumental in accelerating the transition of Japanese coupes from low-cost metal to high-quality machinery. Rivals copied its styling as well. Mazda RX-7, Mitsubishi Starion, Toyota Supra, Chevrolet Corvette, and Dodge Laser all bear considerable resemblance to its shape and attributes, most notably the sleek front end and unusual wraparound glass back window.

To put it mildly, the 924 was originally intended to be a Volkswagen-Audi coupe rather than a Porsche – although Porsche considered offering its own version. Volkswagen did not have its own research and development department at the time and outsourced the majority of its automobile development to Porsche. When the VW-Porsche 914’s four-cylinder engine was phased out in the mid-1970s, it commissioned Porsche to build a replacement.

To maximize the usage of Volkswagen components and keep production costs low, Porsche chose a conventional front-engined, rear-wheel-drive, 2+2 seating configuration. It chose the new Audi 2-liter fuel-injected straight-four engine, which was tweaked to produce an astounding 125 horsepower. It was angled 40 degrees to one side to maintain a low bonnet.

Suspension components were sourced from a VW Golf and Beetle combo, while the layout of MacPherson struts and semi-trailing arms appeared to be lifted from a 911. Additionally, Golf supplied the rack-and-pinion steering system, instrument gauges, and several interior components.

The most notable feature was the Combination of physical rear transaxle gearbox, it transferred weight to the rear suspension and generated a 50:50 load distribution for enhanced driving.

Continuous improvement strengthened the breed and helped establish the 924 as a popular model. Porsche introduced the 924 Turbo in 1979 to assuage critics of the original car’s poor performance.

On the outside, this car can be identified by the presence of additional cooling intakes in the nose and a NACA duct on the bonnet. Under the hood, a turbocharger boosted the engine’s power to 170 hp, along with a significantly higher peak torque of 181 lb-ft.

This resulted in a top speed of 142 mph and a 0-60 mph sprint time of 6.9 seconds as tested by Autocar, which was enough to embarrass the contemporaneous 911 SC! Nonetheless, the 924 Turbo suffered from significant turbo lag (albeit not as much as other turbocharged cars of the era), making handling more difficult.

In 1981, a quicker version, the 924 Carrera GT, was produced. It was a limited production run of 400 vehicles built for motor racing homologation. The 2-liter turbocharged engine received an intercooler, increased compression, and other changes, resulting in 210 horsepower and 203 pound-feet of torque. The 0-60 time was reduced to 6.5 seconds and the top speed was increased to approximately 150 mph.

In 1981, the 924 was supplanted by the 944, but it was not yet obsolete. It was resurrected as the 924S, equipped with the base 944’s 2.5-liter engine to guarantee Porsche had a moderately priced model to compete with popular Japanese coupes. By the time it was finally phased out in 1988, it had built around 152,000 units. This not only obliterated the 914 but also netted Porsche a tidy profit.

Summary

The concept was not novel – Ferrari employed it on the 275GTB a decade ago, and the recently canceled 928 project featured a comparable transaxle – but it was the first time it was applied to a mass production coupe. This would contribute significantly to the 924’s excellent handling. Finally, all mechanical components were encased in a sleek and attractive bodyshell. It had an aerodynamic drag coefficient of 0.36, which was excellent in those days.

:eight_pointed_black_star: Further Porsche 924 variants

Further Porsche 924 variants

Starting in 1979, a five-speed transmission was offered in normally aspirated Porsches (type 016) and was standard on all turbocharged Porsches (type G31). It had a dog-leg shift arrangement, with first gear underneath reverse on the left side.

This transmission was sturdy but costly because of the 915 internal components and was replaced in 1980 with a standard H-pattern Audi five-speed transmission on all non-turbo automobiles.

Originally, this lighter-duty design was reserved for the more powerful 924 Turbo. The front brakes were solid discs, while the rear brakes were drums. However, beginning with the 1980 model year, the standard 924 was available with four-wheel disc brakes, five-stud hubs, and alloy wheels from the 924 Turbo. Additionally, basic brakes might be an option on the turbo to save money.

:small_red_triangle_down: Porsche 924 Turbo

Porsche management quickly realized the need for a more powerful variant of the 924 that could serve as a bridge between the entry-level 924s and the 911s.

Porsche elected to install turbochargers for the 924 after seeing their benefits on various race cars and the 1975 911 Turbo. The 924 Turbo was eventually introduced as a 1978 model.

Porsche began with the same Audi-sourced VW EA831 2.0 L I4 engine, created an entirely new cylinder head (hand-assembled in Stuttgart), reduced the compression ratio to 7.5:1, and engineered a K-26 turbocharger for it. With a boost pressure of 10 psi (69 kPa), output grew to 168 hp (125 kW) at 5,500 rpm and torque increased to 181 lb-ft (245 Nm) at 3,500 rpm.

Because the engine unit for the 924 Turbo weighed approximately 65 lb (29 kg) heavier, the front spring rates and anti-roll bars were altered. Weight distribution was now 49/51 front to rear, compared to 48/52 front to rear in the original 924.

To aid in the car’s functionality and to differentiate it from the naturally aspirated version, Porsche installed a NACA duct in the hood and air intakes in the nose badge panel, 15-inch spoke-style alloy wheels, four-wheel disc brakes with five-stud hubs, and a five-speed transmission.

Optional forged 16-inch flat wheels in the manner of the 928 were available, but fitment specifications were identical to those of the 911, with which the 924 shared wheel offsets. Porsche internally referred to it as the “931” (left-hand drive) and “932” (right-hand drive), similar to the 911 Carrera Turbo’s “Type 930” designation.

A supercharger cooled solely by engine oil resulted in reduced equipment life and turbo seal and seat issues. Porsche corrected the faults by releasing a redesigned 924 Turbo Series 2 in 1979 (although the badging remained “924 turbo”).

By utilizing a smaller turbocharger operating at a higher boost setting, a slightly increased compression ratio of 8:1, and an enhanced fuel injection system with DITC ignition triggered by the flywheel, dependability was improved and output boosted to 174 hp (130 kW; 176 PS).

The 924 Turbo was introduced in late 1979 for the 1980 model year in North America. It was burdened with more weight as a result of federally mandated huge bumpers and other safety devices, as well as diminished power as a result of rigorous emission controls.

The engine produced 143 horsepower (107 kW), approximately 20% less than the European equivalent. Power was boosted slightly to 154 hp (115 kW) for the 1981 model year, and the transmission was changed to a normal H-pattern configuration.

:small_red_triangle_down: Porsche Carrera GT 924

Porsche debuted a pearl-white 924 supercar with Carrera insignia at the 1979 Frankfurt Auto Show. A year later, Porsche introduced the 924 Carrera GT, signaling that the 924’s future will be in competition, not as a bargain Porsche. Keep in mind that the “Carrera” emblem was originally intended for high-performance vehicles and was not even available on the 911.

The design painted a remarkably accurate picture of what the production version would look like, with the only significant difference being the boxier bonnet intake. Oh, and neither the tomato-red interior nor the black exterior made it into production — which is either sad or great, depending on who you ask.

However, the stunner came later: Porsche was about to run the 924 Carrera GT at LeMans after a decade of triumph in the 24-hour race. Porsche was need to construct 400 units of the automobile in order to achieve this. Power was increased to 207bhp via an intercooler fed through the boxier scoop.

Compression ratio was increased, and for the first time in a Porsche, digital ignition was implemented. Metal arch extensions were replaced with fiberglass, and the ride height was reduced by ten millimeters in the front and fifteen millimeters in the rear.

Porsche created a limited-edition Carrera 924 GTS in 1981, and all 59 units were pre-sold. In comparison to the “regular” GT, the GTS received a boost! Increased boost (1 bar vs. 0.75 bar on the GT), 130lb weight savings, and 242hp. Additionally, a completely reworked suspension beneath the frame boosted dynamic performance, making it suited for “de la Sartre’s” brutal track.

At Le Mans in 1980, the 924 Carrera GT participated in the GTP class. The best car in the sixth rank overall, which was not exceptional by Porsche standards but was an incredible performance for a car that began as a low-budget vehicle crammed with VW-sourced components.

:small_red_triangle_down: Porsche 924 Carrera GTR

The 924 Carrera GTR race vehicle was the pinnacle advancement of the 924 in its race trim, producing 375 horsepower (280 kW; 380 PS) from a heavily customized version of the 2.0 L I4 engine used in all 924s and weighing in at 930 kg (2,050 lb).

This resulted in a 4.7-second 0–60 mph (97 km/h) time and a top speed of 180 mph (290 km/h). Porsche fielded three 924 GTRs in the 1980 24 Hours of Le Mans, finishing sixth, 12th, and 13th overall. Additionally, a 924GTR rally race vehicle and two other GTRs are being built (Miller and BF Goodrich). There were a total of 17 (some sources indicate 19) Carrera GTRs manufactured.

Finally, Porsche entered one of two specially built 924 Carrera GTPs (dubbed the “944GTP Le Mans”) in 1981, in which Porsche Motorsports debuted a highly modified 2.5-liter I4 engine. This engine produced 420 horsepower with four valves per cylinder, dual overhead camshafts, twin balancing shafts, and a single turbocharger K28 (313 kW; 426 PS).

This final variation finished eighth overall and spent the least amount of time in the pits of any other car. This new 2.5-liter configuration engine predates the 944 platforms and the subsequent 1987–88 944S 16V M44/40 engine.

The 924 Turbo was discontinued in 1982, save for the Italian market, which continued production until 1984. Given the constraints on engines greater than 2 liters, the impending 2.5-liter 944 was taxed much more.

:small_red_triangle_down: Porsche 924S

In 1984, Volkswagen decided to discontinue production of the engine blocks used in the 2.0 L 924, putting Porsche in a bind. The 924 was significantly less expensive than its 944 stablemates, and its discontinuation left Porsche without an economical entry-level model.

A slightly detuned version of the 944’s 163 horsepower 2.5 litre straight four was best to the 924’s smaller body with 5 lug wheels and 944-style brakes while keeping the 924’s early interior. As a result, 1986’s 148 horsepower 924S was born. Porsche has also decided to reintroduce the 924 to the American market at a starting price of less than $20,000.

In 1988, the 924S’ final year of production, power was boosted to 158 PS (116 kW; 156 bhp), matching the previous year’s Le Mans spec cars and the base 944 (which had been detuned by 3 PS (2 kW; 3 bhp) for 1988).

This was accomplished by changing the pistons, which increased the S’ compression ratio from 9.7:1 to 10.2:1, resulting in an increase in the octane rating from 91 to 95. Due to its reduced weight and more aerodynamic body, the 924S was somewhat faster than the standard 944. Additionally, the 1988 model gained rear seat three-point safety belts.

Summary

A more potent 924 was needed to bridge the gap between introduction 924s and 911s, Porsche executives concluded… Porsche elected to install turbochargers for the 924 after seeing their benefits on various race cars and the 1975 911 Turbo. The 924 Turbo was eventually introduced as a 1978 model.

:eight_pointed_black_star: Which should I purchase?

Porsche

The early automobiles (1978–80) are distinguished by their pristine exterior and wild Pasha check interiors. 1979’s two-tone paint treatments are likewise evocative of the era.

These early cars will either have a pretty underwhelming four-speed manual transmission or a ‘dog-leg’ five-speed transmission (with first gear exiting the ‘H’ to the left and back). That was not corrected until the 1980 Audi 5-speeder (1st/2nd in line, 5th out to the right).

The greatest 924 purchases will be those fixed with DME, as these vehicles are more evolved (no hot start issues, quieter, and with better handling, interiors, and optional equipment).

From 1983 onwards, models included a small rear lip spoiler (a 1982 option that may be retrofitted) and an electronic tilt sunroof. Air conditioning was often not included in the standard specification of any UK 924, and the cabin can grow quite stuffy. The tilt sunroof is therefore a nice choice to have, otherwise you’ll develop a habit of occasionally opening the driver’s window a crack.

To be honest, the early Martini model offers nothing in comparison to the later, more equipped cars, and while the 924S ‘Le Mans’ is quite rare, it is the 924S to own. If you’re looking for a 924 with attitude, the Turbo is worth considering, while 1981 model year ‘Series 2’ automobiles are the best deals (and marginally less likely to cook their turbos). It’s a very quick point-to-point tourer with improved suspension and all-disc brakes.

Finding an uncrashable, in good condition Carrera GT is exceedingly difficult, not least since some vehicles’ polyurethane arches and wings have deteriorated. Authenticity is also a factor in the CGTs. As with the extremely rarer GTS, these specials are typically only available through expert assistance.

:small_red_triangle_down: Specifications

Model 924 924 Turbo 924S
Year of production 1976-85 1979-83 1985(86)-88
No. produced 121,289 units
Weight 1114 kg 1180 kg 1205 kg
Layout Front-engined, Rwd Front-engined, Rwd Front-engined, Rwd
Engine Inline-4, sohc, 2v/cyl. Inline-4, sohc, 2v/cyl, turbo. Inline-4, sohc, 2v/cyl.
Top speed 126 mph* 142 mph* 133 mph* (137 mph**)
0-60 mph 9.5 sec* 6.9 sec* 8.2 sec* (7.4 sec**)
0-100 mph 29.1 sec* 19.7 sec* 20.9 sec* (20.1 sec**)
Gearbox 5M 5M 5M
Capacity 1984 cc 1984 cc 2479 cc
Power 125 hp 170 hp 150 hp (from '86: 160 hp)
Torque 122 lbft 181 lbft 144 lbft (from '86: 151 lbft)
Suspensions (F/R) Strut / semi-trailing arm Strut / semi-trailing arm Strut / semi-trailing arm

:small_red_triangle_down: Prices

This is the finest part — few prestigious performance cars are as reasonable as this one, owing to the car’s undeserved reputation and image. For a few hundred pounds, you can purchase rough examples. However, don’t get too enthusiastic about this potential, as inexpensive-924s can prove pricey in the long run, and restorations aren’t really feasible – unless it’s a Martini or Le Man’s special, and even then, careful financial planning is required.

Expect to pay roughly £1500 for a nice model, however, Turbos in this condition may bring well over £2000. Excellent (but not necessarily Concours) automobiles start at roughly £3000, making them an absolute steal.

However, we believe that prices will not remain this low for much longer, particularly for the Carreras, where maybe less than half of the 75 UK cars are still around or on these shores. This is certain to increase costs, and buyers should anticipate paying 911 rates for a good, unmolested example.

:small_red_triangle_down: The feel of the 924

The 924 clearly does not get the credit it deserves, not only for saving the company during the OPEC embargo but also for refusing to uphold its quality attributes. As with any Porsche, regardless of trim level, the 924 is capable of putting a smile on your face. Of course, you may prefer the GTR over the base 924, but with only 49 units made, the former is unlikely to be easy to come by.

The weight distribution is about 50-50, owing to the transaxle (which essentially means the gearbox is hidden beneath the boot floor) balancing the engine’s weight. It will not be as fast as the more powerful air-cooled units Porsche fixed to the 911, nor will it match the 944 or 968’s flowing design lines.

The 924, on the other hand, boasted a turbocharger that was decades ahead of its time. The turbocharged EA831’s first edition (Series 1) delivers boost at the higher end of the RPM range, whereas the second iteration (Series 2) distributes boost across a larger RPM range.

Summary

Due to the absence of power steering, you will frequently find yourself fighting the steering wheel, particularly on slow curves or even more so while parking. Your forearms will receive a solid workout during any extended track session in the Porsche 924, but the delight you will experience will drown out the hurting muscles.

Frequently Asked Questions - FAQs

People asked many questions about Porsche 924. We discussed a few of them below:

:one: Is the Porsche 924 a desirable automobile?

It’s reasonably practical, mechanically straightforward, and, it must be noted, wears the appropriate insignia. While the 924 remains in the shadow of the 944 and 968, decent 924s are now gaining in value, so if you’re looking for an economical Porsche but don’t fancy a Boxster, now may be the time to buy.

:two: Is the Porsche 924’s price increasing?

The humble Porsche 924 Lux has climbed in value from an average of £8,100 to £8,550 in just three months, while even the finest concours versions of the ultra-rare Porsche 944 Turbo S cabriolet have a top Guide value of £37,800.

:three: Can you drive a Porsche 924 on a daily basis?

Numerous Porsche 924, 928, and 911 models can be seen being used as daily drives, but BMWs from this era are a little more difficult to locate, perhaps with the exception of the E24 6-Series, which is significantly older than it appears. Similarly, when it comes to Swedish automobiles, we are spoiled for solid options.

:four: Who was the founder of Porsche?

Porsche has become synonymous with sports cars and racecars, which is precisely what business founders Ferdinand Porsche and his son Ferdinand (“Ferry”) set out to achieve when they opened their doors in 1948 with 200 employees.

:five: What is the top speed of a Porsche 924?

The 924 5 Speed accelerates from 0 to 100 km/h (62mph) in 9.6 seconds, with a top speed of 127 mph (204 km/h), and a curb weight of 2449 lbs (1111 kgs). It is powered by a naturally aspirated Inline 4 cylinder engine.

:six: Who designed the Porsche 924?

Porsche 924 - Porsche of America, Inc. Porsche developed the 924 on behalf of Volkswagen as the successor to the 914 and eventually produced it internally. Audi’s new entry-level model is manufactured in Neckarsulm.

:seven: Is the Porsche 944 a reliable vehicle?

These vehicles can and will be extremely reliable if routine maintenance is performed and no shortcuts are taken. With the 944 acquiring tremendous value in recent years, there has never been a better time to purchase and enjoy an affordable entry point into vintage Porsche ownership.

:eight: What is the horsepower rating of a Porsche 924?

Porsche took a whole new approach when building the 924’s drivetrain. For the first time, a front-mounted liquid-cooled engine was used. This was a cylinder layout with in-line cylinders. Porsche modified the Audi 100’s 125 horsepower engine.

:nine: Who owns Porsche?

Porsche’s parent business is the Volkswagen Group. In 2011, Volkswagen and Porsche collaborated. The Volkswagen Group also owns a number of other premium carmakers, including Audi, Lamborghini, bentley, and Bugatti.

:keycap_ten: Are Porsches reliable?

Porsche 911 outscored all other models in the 2021 survey. This resulted in it being the company’s most dependable car for three straight years.

:green_book: Conclusion:

Without a question, the 924 is the underappreciated hero of Porsche’s glorious history. The 924 appeared to have left enough of a legacy to endure a lunchtime. Until recently, that is. The car, which had been overshadowed by its transaxle siblings, is finally gaining traction. Its simple style, compactness, and ease of maintenance, paired with its exceptional balance and robust construction, are finally winning converts. The 924 is a coveted choice for aficionados worldwide due to its critical impact on the life of the Porsche company, its unexpectedly low price for a Porsche, and its racing legacy packed into a four-door coupe.

Related Articles

Porsche 924 is a sports automobile, from 1976 until 1988 developed by Audi in Neckarsulm on behalf of Porsche AG of Germany. The 924 was the first road-going Porsche with a front-engine rear-wheel-drive arrangement, even though the water-cooled, front-engined 928 grans Turismo was conceived sooner.

porsche 924

About Porsche 924

Name Porsche 924
Manufacturer Porsche AG
Production 1976-1988
Class Sports car
Designer Harm Lagaay
Layout Front-mid engine, rear-wheel-drive
Weight 2381 lbs

The Porsche 924, which debuted in 1976 as the successor to the Porsche 914, was designed by Porsche on behalf of Volkswagen and later built in-house. Audi produced the new entry-level model at Neckarsulm.

The 924’s body was designed with good aerodynamics in mind. The flat bonnet and pop-up headlamps were explicitly designed to accommodate this. A black rear spoiler was added in MY 1983, which improved the Cd value even further.

When it came to developing the 924’s drivetrain, Porsche took a completely different approach. A liquid-cooled front engine was employed for the first time. The cylinders were arranged in a straight line.

The 125 horsepower engine was taken from the Audi 100 and tweaked by Porsche. The transaxle idea was used to convey the driving power. Only the Porsche-built 2.5-liter four-cylinder in-line engine of the 944 was utilized, starting with the 924 S, which was produced starting with the model year 1986.

The Porsche 924 S, which debuted in 1986, was a substantial technical advancement for the Porsche 924 model range. Many of the components of this vehicle date back to 944.

These comprised the engine, braking system, chassis components, and interior components. The 924 S was also pushed closer to the 944 by the standard aluminum wheels with the “telephone dial” style.

The 2.5-liter engine in the 924 S was based on the 944 and produced 150 horsepower at first, then 160 horsepower by MY 1988.

Model Version of Porsche 924

Porsche 924 (1976-85) Porsche 924S (1986-88)
Headlights that pop up Headlights that pop up
The back cover made of glass The back cover made of glass
MY 1983 black PU rear spoiler Rear spoiler in black PU
Bumpers are built into the body’s form. Bumpers are built into the body’s form.
As of MY1981, side directions indicators are available. Indicators on the sides of the road

Porsche 924 for Sale

porsche for sale

The 924 had an image problem when it first went on sale because it broke with Porsche tradition — not only did it lack a boxer engine, but it was also water-cooled and mounted on the “wrong side.” To the chagrin of Porsche purists, its mass-produced interior pieces showed its Volkswagen heritage.

It was, on the other hand, decently priced. Although no Porsche could be called inexpensive, the 924 came the closest. It cost a little more than Japanese and British coupes, but it had better dynamics, style, and German build quality — listen to the thud of its doors.

It should be recognized, however, that the early automobiles were far from flawless. Rust issues, a 4-speed gearbox, and jittery handling caused by roll-induced steer and significant lift-off oversteer plagued it. All of these issues have been resolved by 1978.

It possessed the industry’s most excellent anti-rust treatment, a superb 5-speed transmission, and vice-free handling. With a peak speed of 126 mph and a 0-60 mph time of little over 9 seconds, performance was competitive for its class, albeit not particularly impressive.

Its high-speed cruising performance, as well as its steady handling, were complimented by automotive critics. Its steering was as precise, light, and fast as a 911’s, and it felt just as good. Its chassis was poised and precise in turns, giving it the feel of a thoroughbred sports car.

It went into slight understeer at the limit to maintain a solid back end, making it safer and more straightforward to drive than the 911. Despite the lack of rear drums, braking was superior to competitors.

On the negative side, noise reduction was inadequate. The cabin might hear a lot of tire sounds and suspension noises when driving on challenging roads.

Porsche 924 History

The 924 was initially a cooperative project between Volkswagen and Porsche, developed by the Vertriebsgesellschaft (VG), a combined sales and marketing firm sponsored jointly by Porsche and Volkswagen to advertise and sell sports automobiles (Ludvigsen: Porsche, Excellence was Expected).

It was supposed to be Volkswagen’s flagship coupé, and it was codenamed “Project 425” throughout development. It intended to be Porsche’s entry-level sports vehicle, replacing the 914.

Volkswagen didn’t have an extensive internal research and design division for producing sports vehicles at the time, and Porsche had been undertaking the majority of the company’s development work anyhow, according to a 1940s agreement.

In keeping with tradition, Porsche was hired to design a new sports car with the stipulation that it must be compatible with an existing VW/Audi inline-four engine.

  • To achieve a 48/52 front/rear weight distribution, Porsche used a rear-wheel-drive system and a rear-mounted transaxle for the design; this slight rear weight bias assisted both traction and braking balance.

  • The 1973 oil crisis, a series of automobile-related legislative reforms adopted during the 1970s, and a change of Volkswagen directors made the rationale for a Volkswagen sports car less compelling, and the 425 projects were shelved.

  • After much consideration at VW, the idea was shelved outright in favor of the cheaper, more practical Scirocco vehicle based on the Golf.

  • In need of a replacement for the 914, Porsche struck a deal with Volkswagen executives to repurchase the design.

  • The Porsche 914 was retired before the 924 was introduced, resulting in the 912E being reintroduced to the North American market for a year to fill the void.

  • The agreement stipulated that the automobile would be constructed in the former NSU facility in Neckarsulm, located north of Porsche’s headquarters in Stuttgart, with Volkswagen acting as a subcontractor.

  • As a result, Volkswagen personnel would work on the manufacturing line (under Porsche’s production specialists), while Porsche would own the design.

  • It was unveiled at a press conference in November 1975 at the port of La Grande Motte in the Camargue region of southern France rather than at a car show.

  • The car’s low cost of construction made it lucrative and relatively easy to finance for Porsche.

  • Despite being panned for its performance, it became one of Porsche’s most popular models.

Summary:

While the automobile was hailed for its style, handling, fuel efficiency, and dependability, it was panned by the automotive press for its low performance, particularly in US-spec models. Rapid acceleration was impossible with only 95–110 horsepower, but the Porsche name carried higher expectations.

Porsche 924 Turbo

Porsche turbo

Porsche management quickly realized that a more powerful version of the 924 was needed to take advantage of the model’s exceptional balance and close the gap between the standard 924 and the 911.

Porsche elected to utilize turbochargers for the 924 after discovering the benefits of turbochargers on many race vehicles and the 1975 911 Turbo (930), finally introducing the 924 Turbo in 1978.

The 924 Turbo received a lot of positive feedback from the automotive community and media when it first came out. It was praised for its supercar-like performance and flawless handling and its build quality, overall attention to proportion, and more purposeful appearance.

The turbocharged I4 was panned for its coarseness, but critics overlooked it in favor of its efficiency and significant power gain over the n/a vehicle.

In comparison to the Aston Martin V8, Porsche 928, Porsche 911 3.0SC, BMW 635 CSI, and Lotus Eclat 523, Motor Magazine found the 924 Turbo to be joint second in top speed (achieving an average of 142 mph) and second in 0-60 mph acceleration (achieving a time of 6,9 seconds), being topped only by the Aston V8 at 145 mph and Porsche 911 at 6.5 seconds, a remarkable feat considering the differences in displacement and price.

Carrera GT

At the Frankfurt Auto Show in 1979, Porsche showed a Carrera-badged concept version of the 924. Porsche produced the 924 Carrera GT a year later, in 1980, signaling their aim to compete with the 924.

Porsche transformed the 924 Turbo into the racing vehicle they sought by installing an intercooler and boosting compression to 8.5:1, among other minor improvements.

They dubbed it the “924 Carrera GT.” The Carrera GT was constructed in 406 units (including prototypes) to meet Group 4 racing criteria. For the UK market, 75 of the 400 road-going models were built in right-hand drive.

Porsche produced the limited-edition 924 Carrera GTS in 1981. There were 59 GTS cars made, all in left-hand drive, with 15 of them being race-ready Clubsport variants.

Carrera GTR

The 924 Carrera GTR racing vehicle, which weighed in at 930 kg and produced 375 horsepower (280 kW; 380 PS) from a heavily tuned version of the 2.0 L I4 used in all 924s, was the final evolution of the 924 in its race trim (2,050 lb).

This resulted in a 4.7-second 0–60 mph (97 km/h) time and a peak speed of 180 mph (290 km/h). Porsche fielded three 924 GTRs in the 1980 24 Hours of Le Mans, finishing 6th, 12th, and 13th overall.

In addition, a 924GTR rally race vehicle and two additional GTRs are being built (Miller and BF Goodrich). There were a total of ten Carrera GTRs made.

Finally, Porsche entered one of two specially constructed 924 Carrera GTPs (the “944GTP Le Mans”) in 1981, in which Porsche Motorsports debuted a new prototype 2.5-liter I4 engine.

To create 420 horsepower, this engine had four valves per cylinder, two overhead camshafts, dual balancing shafts, and a single turbocharger K28 (313 kW; 426 PS).

This penultimate variation finished eighth overall and spent the least amount of time in the pits of any other vehicle. The 944 platforms and the later 1987–88 944S 16V M44/40 power plant are based on this new 2.5-liter configuration engine.

Summary:

Except for the Italian market, which remained until 1984, the Porsche 924 Turbo production halted in 1982. Because of the limits on engines greater than two liters, the upcoming 2.5 liters 944 will be taxed at a substantially higher rate.

Frequently Asked Question

Here are some faqs related to Porsche 924:

1. Is the Porsche 924 a collector’s item?

The Porsche 924 Turbos (also known as 931s by their internal project numbers) are extremely rare, although a good one may be had for $10,000. Original 924s with little mileage are plentiful.

2. Is the Porsche 924 becoming more valuable?

While still in the shadow of the vehicles that came after it (the 944 and 968), decent 924s are now gaining in value, so if you want a Porsche but don’t want a Boxster, now could be the time to buy.

3. Is there a difference between a Porsche 924 and a Porsche 944?

The way the engine is installed in the front subframe is one of the most significant distinctions between the engines and, as a result, the two versions. The 944 engine is secured on an aluminum cross-member, which also houses the front control arms and steering rack. The 944 engine is mounted on two mounts on top of the cross member.

4. What is the top speed of a Porsche 924?

The 924 5 Speed features a naturally-aspirated Inline 4 cylinder engine, Petrol motor that accelerates from 0 to 100 km/h (62mph) in 9.6 seconds, with a top speed of 127 mph (204 km/h) and a curb weight of 2449 lbs (1111 kgs).

5. Is Investing in a Porsche 924 a Good Idea?

It’s also a fantastic investment. Porsche 924s from the late 1970s and early 1980s are frequently ignored, making them inexpensive and accessible.

6. Who designed the Porsche 924?

Porsche USA’s Porsche 924. The Porsche 924, which debuted in 1976 as the successor to the Porsche 914, was designed by Porsche on behalf of Volkswagen and later built in-house. Audi produced the new entry-level model at Neckarsulm.

7. Does a Volkswagen engine power the Porsche 924?

The 2.0-liter engine of the Porsche 924 has received a lot of flak, with claims that it was initially a VW van engine. It was based on a 1960s engine and developed by Audi in the early 1970s for use in the Porsche 924, VW LT van, and Audi 100.

8. Are components for the Porsche 924 and 944 interchangeable?

While the entire automobile is identical, the dashboard, electrics, and some suspension components are unique to this type and cannot be swapped with other variants. The early 944 shared many parts with the 87-88 924S, although the 924S benefited from some of the Series II upgrades.

9. In German, what does Porsche mean?

While the brand is commonly known as Porsche, the corporation’s full name comes from its founder, Dr. Ing. Ferdinand Porsche. The abbreviation “AG” stands for “Aktiengesellschaft,” which translates to “shares company” in German.

10. Why is the Porsche 959 a prohibited vehicle?

Because Porsche failed to give the United States Department of Transportation four automobiles necessary for destructive crash testing, the car was never licensed for street usage in the United States by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

Conclusion

In the United Kingdom, the BRSCC and Porsche Racing Drivers Association conduct their own 924 racing series. Jeff May, who was the championship coordinator until his death on November 10, 2003, founded the Porsche 924 Championship in 1992. In addition, Jeff May was a founder member of Porsche Club Great Britain. The 924S is also able to compete in the 944-Spec racing class in the United States.

Related Articles

Porsche 993
Who makes Porsche

Porsche designed and built the Porsche 924 for Volkswagen, making its début in 1976 as the 914’s replacement. Neckarsulm is where Audi built the new entry-level model. The 924’s body was designed to maximize aerodynamics. This is why the flat bonnet and pop-up headlamps were devised. MY 1983 added a black rear spoiler, which increased the Cd value even further.

Porsche 924

Porsche 924

To capitalize on the 924’s excellent balance and bridge the gap between the standard 924 and 911, Porsche management instantly realized that a more powerful 924 was needed. Porsche opted to utilize turbochargers on the 924 after seeing their benefits on various race cars, particularly the 1975 911 Turbo (930).

In its early days, the 924 Turbo was a massive hit with the automotive and media communities. As a result, it garnered high marks for its performance, handling, and overall quality. Detractors ignored the turbocharged I4’s efficiency and massive power improvement over the n/a car despite its roughness.

According to Motor Magazine, the 924 Turbo was joint second in top speed (averaging an average of 142 mph) and second in the 0-60 mph acceleration (achieving a time of 6,9 seconds) when compared to the Aston Martin V8 (145 mph) and the Porsche 911 (6.5 seconds), a remarkable feat considering the displacement and price differences.

Porsche substantially modified the VW EA831 2.0 L I4 engine already used in the n/a 924 to power the 924 Turbo, deciding to hand-assemble the engine at the Porsche factory in Zuffenhausen, Stuttgart.

A reworked crankcase, connecting rods, cylinder head gasket, crankshaft, and an all-new aluminum-silicon alloy cylinder head were created and installed by Porsche experts.

The compression ratio was decreased to 7.5:1 by using dished combustion chambers and specifically shaped pistons, which helped better accept the KK&K K-26 turbocharger without producing pre-ignition.

Exhaust valve diameter was also enlarged over the n/a engine, and platinum-tipped spark plugs were utilized. At 5,500 rpm, power increased to 170 hp (127 kW) and 181 lb-ft (245 Nm) of torque at 3,500 rpm with ten psi (69 kPa) of boost.

Because the engine component for the 924 Turbo weighed roughly 65 lb (29 kg), front spring rates and anti-roll bars were changed. Compared to the initial 924 figure of 48/52 front to rear, the weight distribution was now 49/51.

To distinguish this model from the standard 924, Porsche added a NACA duct in the hood. This allowed heat to escape when stationary and caused hot air to be sucked out of the engine compartment due to the low pressure created by the louvered alloy engine under-tray when driving.

Porsche 924

In addition to the NACA duct, the badge panel was adjusted with four slotted air vents, with open ducts added to either side of the front valance to aid in cooling the front brakes.

Standard equipment included:

A more extensive diameter torque tube was used to deliver power from the clutch plate to the gearbox. There was an option for forged 16-inch flat wheels in the style of the Porsche 928.; however, fitment was based on the 911, with which the 924 shared wheel offsets.

The rear hatch was modified with a rubber duck-tail spoiler, which reduced the already low drag coefficient from.36 to.33. Porsche dubbed the 924 Turbo “931” internally, similar to how the 911 Carrera Turbo was dubbed “Type 930.”

Although right-hand-drive parts were designated with the prefix “932,” both left- and right-hand-drive automobiles were referred to as “931,” and this nomenclature is still used by Porsche fans today.

Due to a lighter curb weight, the turbocharged VW EA831 engine allowed the 924 to match the performance of the more significant, more powerful Porsche 928 and come surprisingly close to that of the 911 SC (180 bhp (134 kW)).

Still, it also brought reliability issues, as seen in other turbocharged cars of the era. This was primarily due to the general public’s lack of understanding of operating and maintaining such an early oil-cooled turbo arrangement.

Allowing the engine to idle and the Turbo to cool before shutting it down helps to prevent turbo seal and component failure, extending the Turbo’s lifespan significantly.

Porsche launched a redesigned 924 Turbo Series 2 for the 1981 model year (although badging still read “924 turbos”). Turbochargers with a larger compressor and a smaller turbine, 8:1 compression, including a new DITC (Digital Ignition Timing Control) ignition technology for the fuel injection system. Controlled by the flywheel, they raised peak output to 177 horsepower (132 kW).

The Porsche 924 Turbo debuted in North America in late 1979 for the 1980 model year. Due to legally mandated big bumpers and other safety devices, it was heavier than Euro-spec cars and had less power due to tight emissions controls.

The engine produced 143 horsepower (107 kW), which was roughly 20% less than the European counterpart. Power was boosted to 154 hp (115 kW) for the 1981 model year, and the transmission was changed to a standard H-pattern configuration (North America only).

Before the 924 Carrera GT release, the 924 Turbo had some success in motorsport, primarily in rallying. Jürgen Barth and Roland Kussmaul led an effort to build a competition-spec 924 Turbo between 1977 and 1980.

The competition cars were built from prototype 931s obtained from Porsche by Peter Falk (Ingenieur), the company’s head of motorsport. Modifications included a wider track, Rallye arches, and auxiliary light pods, among others.

Despite being de-specced due to homologation regulations, the car finished fourth in the GT4 class at the 1979 Monte Carlo Rally with Barth and his co-driver Kussmaul at the wheel.

During the 1979 season, the same car and drivers competed in the historic 19,000-kilometer 1979 Round Australia Trial. With a total penalty time of 13 hours and 9 minutes, the car won its class and completed the 134-stage trial in record time.

The 924 Turbo made history in 1981 when it was equipped with a JVC camera inside the cabin, allowing it to capture the first-ever in-car footage of the famed Monte Carlo Rally. This was its final season before being replaced by the intercooler Porsche 924 Carrera GT.

Summary

Porsche 924 Turbo was created to bridge the gap between the standard 924 and 911. Powered by a VW EA831 engine, it produced 180 bhp (134 kW) and came close to that of the 911 SC (180 bhp), but suffered from reliability issues.

Porsche 924

Porsche History

An agency partnered with Porsche and Volkswagen to promote and sell sports cars, the Vertriebsgesellschaft (VG), designed the 924. (Ludvigsen: Porsche, Excellence was Expected). “Project 425” was referred to in the early stages of development as Volkswagen’s flagship coupe sports vehicle.

It was conceived as a replacement for the 914, Porsche’s entry-level sports car. Due to an agreement made in the 1940s with the Porsche firm, Volkswagen didn’t have an extensive in-house research and design section for sports vehicles at the time.

As is customary, Porsche was asked to create a new sports car that would be compatible with an existing VW/Audi inline-four engine, in keeping with the tradition.

When Porsche adopted a 48/52 front/rear weight distribution, the rear-mounted transaxle assisted both traction and braking balance by creating a small amount of rear weight bias.

The 425 project was discontinued due to the 1973 oil crisis, the passage of numerous automobile-related legislation modifications in the 1970s, and the shift in Volkswagen directors.

After a lot of deliberation at VW, the Scirocco idea was dropped in favor of the more affordable and practical Golf-based Scirocco.

To find a replacement for the 914, Porsche reached an agreement with Volkswagen management to buy back the design. The Porsche 912E returned to the North American market for a year to fill the void left by the withdrawal of the 914.

According to the agreement, the automobile would be produced in Neckarsulm, north of Porsche’s headquarters in Stuttgart, with Volkswagen as a subcontractor. While Porsche would own the car’s design, Volkswagen personnel would operate on the assembly line (under the supervision of Porsche’s own manufacturing specialists).

Instead of a car show, it was unveiled at a press conference at the port of La Grande Motte in the Camargue region of southern France in November 1975. Porsche was able to make a profit on the vehicle because of its cheap manufacturing costs. One of Porsche’s most popular models even after being criticized for its performance.

The initial concept featured a four-speed manual transmission from an Audi front-wheel-drive automobile that was repurposed as a rear transaxle. It was connected to VW’s EA831 2.0 L I4 engine.

Using the engine of the Volkswagen LT van (from which, according to common belief, the engine originated) and Audi 100(popular perception is that the engine originated in the LT van, however it was first seen in the Audi car and features a Porsche-designed cylinder head in 924 forms).

Porsche 924

The Audi engine was also utilized in the 1977–1979 AMC Gremlin, Concord, and Spirit and the AMC postal jeeps with a Weber/Holley carburetor. The 924 engine had Bosch K-Jetronic fuel injection in North American trim and produced 95 horsepower (71 kW).

With the introduction of a catalytic converter in mid-1977, this was increased to 110 horsepower (82 kW), reducing the need for power-robbing pollution equipment. For the first 1976 model, a four-speed manual transmission was the only option; later, a five-speed dog-leg transmission was added.

Starting with the 1977.5 model, Audi offered a three-speed automatic transmission. The five-speed transmission was replaced in 1980 with a traditional H-pattern, with reverse now on the right beneath fifth gear.

Minor improvements were made to the model in 1980, including a three-way catalyst and slightly more significant compression, bringing power to 110 hp (82 kW).

Despite this, sales were limited by the strong Deutsche Mark and rising inflation in the United States, as a well-equipped 924 could now easily cost twice as much as the far more powerful Nissan 280ZX.

European models with no emissions equipment produced 123 horsepower (92 kW). They also didn’t have the low-speed impact bumpers and spherical reflectors, as well as side-marker lamps on each end of the body, that the US-spec model did.

Only Mizwa Motors dealerships in Japan specializing in North American and European vehicles could sell the 924. It complied with Japanese government dimensions standards in terms of engine displacement and exterior dimensions aided sales.

Shift patterns with dog-legs The type 016 normally aspirated Porsche had a five-speed transmission available from 1979, and all turbocharged Porsches came standard with one (type G31) with the first gear below reverse on the left side.

Due to the high cost of various 915 internal parts, all non-turbo cars were replaced in 1980 with a standard H-pattern Audi five-speed. Initially, the lighter-duty design was not employed on the more powerful 924 Turbo.

The front brakes were solid discs, and the rear brakes were drums. This braking system, which was seen as a step backward from the 914’s essential four-wheel disc brakes, was condemned in Car & Driver magazine.

Starting with the 1980 model year, four-wheel disc brakes, five-stud hubs, and alloys from the Porsche 924 Turbo were offered as an “S” package on the standard 924. As a cost-cutting approach, standard brakes could be added to the Turbo.

Harm Lagaay, a member of the Porsche style team, developed the folding headlamps, sloping bonnet line, and grille-less snout. And give the car its renowned wedge form. In July 1976, the car was released in the United States as a 1977 model with a starting price of $9,395.

Between 1977 and 1985, Porsche made minor changes to the 924, but there were no significant changes to non-turbo models. Turbocharged models received a slew of non-VW parts throughout the drivetrain.

The M471 disc brake package and forged 16" wheels increased the car’s price by a factor of two. Its design has been regarded as the influence of the Mazda RX-7’s second generation. The 924 was regarded as “the best handling Porsche in the stock form” by J. Pasha in Excellence magazine at the time.

Porsche

Amidst plaudits for the vehicle’s design and performance attributes, automotive publications slammed it for being underwhelming, particularly in US-spec variants. It was impossible to accelerate quickly, but the Porsche name was associated with greater expectations.

Car and Driver magazine declared the 924 Turbo versions “Fast…at Last!” when they were released. The subsequent 924S featured performance comparable to the Turbo, but with far better dependability and for a lower price.

The 1981 and 1982 Turbos and the corresponding unique versions are gaining popularity among collectors, and while many still exist, quality examples are becoming increasingly scarce. The Porsche 924 was phased out in 1988, with Porsche focusing on the quicker 944 as its entry-level vehicle.

Summary

The 924 was intended to be Porsche’s entry-level sports car. one of Volkswagen’s best-selling automobiles even after receiving criticism for its performance. The 1981 and 1982 Porsche 924 Turbo and 924S are gaining popularity among collectors.

Carrera GT

Carrera GT

Carrera-badged 924 concept was shown at Frankfurt Auto Show in 1979 by Porsche. Porsche made the 924 Carrera GT in 1980, a year after the 924 was released.

With the addition of an intercooler and an increased compression ratio to 8.5:1, Porsche was able to turn the 924 Turbo into the race car they desired. The “924 Carrera GT” was the name given to the vehicle.

A total of 406 Carrera GTs (including prototypes) were built to meet Group 4 racing requirements. 75 of the 400 roadgoing cars developed for the UK market are in right-hand drive.

A few numbers of the Porsche 924 Carrera GTS models were made available to the public when the model was introduced in 1981. A total of 59 GTS models were built, all of which were left-hand drives and included 15 race-ready Clubsport models.

Aside from the larger rubber rear spoiler and the flush-mounted front windscreen, the Carrera GT differed from the standard 924 Turbo thanks to its polyurethane plastic front, and rear flared guards, polyurethane plastic front spoiler, and top-mounted intercooler air scoop.

The Carrera GT was distinguished from the original 924 Turbo by a polyurethane plastic front spoiler, a top-mounted air scoop for the intercooler, a somewhat larger rubber rear spoiler, and a flush-mounted front windscreen.

It came standard with Pirelli P6 tires, with Pirelli P7 tires and a limited-slip differential available as options. The NACA duct from the 924 Turbo was removed from the hood, but the air intakes in the badge panel were kept.

Later on, the 944 was inspired by this more aggressive style. The later Carrera GTS was distinguished from the GT by permanent headlamps hidden under Perspex covers (instead of the GT’s pop-up units).

At 1,121 kilogrammes (2,471 lb), GTS models were likewise 59 kg (130 lb) lighter than their GT counterparts, while Clubsport variants were even lighter at 1,060 kg (2,471 lb) (2,337 lb) 210 and 245 horsepower (157 and 183 kW) respectively.

The 924 Carrera GT and 924 Carrera GTS were offered as road vehicles to meet homologation regulations. 280 horsepower (209 kW; 284 PS) Clubsport versions of the GTS were also available, equipped with a Matter roll cage and race seats. Porsche 924 Carrera GT models were given model numbers 937 (left-hand drive) and 938 (right-hand drive).

GTR Carrera

GTR Carrera

The 924 Carrera GTR race car weighed 930 kg and had a well-tuned 2.0 L I4 engine that produced 375 horsepower (280 kW; 380 PS). It was the 924’s final evolution in race trim (2,050 lb).

This resulted in a 4.7-second time from zero to sixty miles per hour (97 kilometers per hour) and a top speed of 180 miles per hour (290 kilometers per hour). Porsche achieved the sixth, twelfth, and thirteenth place in the 1980 24 Hour of Le Mans by three of its 924 GTR models.

The 924GTR rally car is also being developed, as are two additional GTRs (Miller and BF Goodrich). There were a total of 17 Carrera GTRs made (other sources state 19).

In 1981, Porsche Motorsports produced two 924 Carrera GTP prototypes with a new 2.5-liter I4 engine. (the “944GTP Le Mans”). ( To create 420 horsepower, this engine featured a single turbocharger K28 and four valves per cylinder) (313 kW; 426 PS).

This car finished ninth in the overall standings and spent the least amount of time in the pits of any other vehicle. The 944 platforms and the following 1987–88 944S 16V M44/40 engines are powered by this new 2.5-liter configuration engine.

Porsche 924 Turbo production ended in 1982, except the Italian market, which lasted until 1984. The upcoming 2.5 liter 944 will be taxed at a much higher rate due to limits on engines larger than two liters.

924 S

924 S

In 1984, VW decided to stop making the engine blocks used in the 2.0 L 924, putting Porsche in a problematic situation. As a result of its demise, Porsche was left without an affordable entry-level model that competed with the more expensive 944.

The 924 was outfitted with a somewhat detuned version of the 944’s 163 horsepower 2.5-liter straight-four, updated suspension, five-lug wheels, and 944 type brakes, while retaining the 924’s early interior design.

The 1986 924S, which had 148 horsepower, was the result. This is the first time the 924 has been re-introduced to the American market with a starting price of less than $20,000.

To keep pace with the previous year’s Le Mans-spec cars and the base model 944 (which had been detuned by 3 PS (2 kW; 3 bhp) for 1988), power was increased to 158 PS in 1988.

As a result, the S’ octane rating went from 91 to 95 thanks to the use of new pistons that increased its compression ratio from 9.7:1 to 10.2:1. Because of its reduced weight and more aerodynamic design, the 924S was marginally faster than the standard 944.

In the rear seats, three-point safety belts were added in 1988. Due to unfavorable exchange rates in the late 1980s, Porsche opted to concentrate its efforts on its higher-end models, discontinuing the 924S in 1989 and the base 944 the following year.

Annual license plates for cars from 2021-2011:

MODEL 2021 2020 2019 2018 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011
PORSCHE 924 550 474 463 509 532 535 554 574 585 639 748
PORSCHE 924 AUTO 46 42 46 49 51 58 65 68 77 87 115
PORSCHE 924 S 124 110 119 121 130 133 143 141 148 168 186
PORSCHE 924 S AUTO 9 12 8 7 8 7 8 10 12 20 18
PORSCHE 924 TURBO 74 61 58 53 61 63 58 62 56 64 69

Motorsport

Motorsport

In the United Kingdom, the BRSCC and Porsche Racing Drivers Association conduct their own 924 racing series. Jeff May, who was the championship coordinator until his death on November 10, 2003, founded the Porsche 924 Championship in 1992.

In addition, Jeff May was a founder member of Porsche Club Great Britain. The 924S is also able to compete in the 944-Spec racing class in the United States.

Frequently Asked Questions(FAQs)

People asked many questions about “Porsche 924” Few of them were discussed below:

1. Is the Porsche 924 a collector’s item?

In fact, they are so uncommon that few people are aware of their existence, let alone understand why they are so special. Originally, the Porsche 924 was a poor man’s Porsche, similar to today’s entry-level Boxster.

2. Is a Porsche 924 a genuine Porsche?

From 1976 until 1988, the Porsche 924 was a sports automobile developed by Audi in Neckarsulm on behalf of Porsche AG of Germany. The 924 was the first roadgoing Porsche with a front-engine rear-wheel-drive configuration, even though the water-cooled, front-engined 928 grans Turismo was conceived sooner.

3. How excellent is a Porsche 924?

It’s practical, mechanically simple, and, needless to say, wears the proper symbol. While still in the shadow of the cars that came after it (the 944 and 968), If you want a Porsche but don’t want a Boxster, this might be a good time to buy a 924 that is in good condition.

4. Can you drive a Porsche 924 regularly?

There are plenty of Porsche 924, 928, and 911 models on the road today, but BMW cars from this era are a little tougher to come by, except the E24 6-Series, which is much older than it appears. We’re similarly blessed for choice when it comes to Swedish automobiles.

5. What is the value of a 1979 Porsche 924?

Prices for the Porsche 924 1979 starting at $4,100 for the Coupe 924. (base). Leaded Petrol is available for the Porsche 924 1979.

6. How dependable is the Porsche 944?

These cars can and will be highly dependable if regular maintenance is performed and no shortcuts are taken. With the 944’s value skyrocketing in recent years, there’s never been a better time to purchase and enjoy an affordable entry into vintage Porsche ownership.

7. Why is the Porsche 944 so inexpensive?

The 944 has remained reasonably priced due to several factors. Because it was front-engined and water-cooled, Porsche snobs turned their noses up at it. Four-cylinder engines don’t have the same emotional resonance as six-cylinder engines.

8. How can you tell the difference between a Porsche 924 and a Porsche 944?

The way the engine is installed in the front subframe is one of the most significant distinctions between the engines and, as a result, the two versions. The 944 engine is secured on an aluminum cross-member, which also houses the front control arms and steering rack. The 944 engine is mounted on two mounts on top of the cross member.

9. How long can a Porsche 944 be driven?

The device can survive well over 100k miles if properly maintained; the average maximum boost is 1.7-1.75bar. Inspect the engine and power steering for oil leaks; oil pressure should be 5 bar at speed and 2-2.5 bar at hot idle.

10. What is the most valuable Porsche?

The 5 Most Rare Porsches Ever Produced are:

  1. Abarth Carrera GTL Porsche 356B (20/21 Units).

  2. 911 SC/RS Porsche Porsche 911 SC/RS Porsche 911 SC/RS Porsche 911 SC (20 Units).

  3. Porsche 356 America Roadster 3 Porsche 356 America Roadster 3 (16 Units).

  4. Porsche 964 Speedster Turbo-Look Porsche 964 Speedster Turbo-Look Porsche 964 Speedster Turbo-Look (15 Units).

  5. Porsche 993 Turbo Cabriolet (Porsche 993 Turbo Cabriolet) (14 Units).

Conclusion

The Porsche 924 was initially a cooperative project between Volkswagen and Porsche. It was intended to be Porsche’s entry-level sports car. Despite being panned for its low performance, it became one of Volkswagen’s best-selling models. The 1981 and 1982 Turbos and 924S are gaining in popularity among collectors. The Porsche 924 was introduced in 1984 as an entry-level model for the Porsche 944. The 924 Carrera GTR was a heavily tuned version of the 2.0 L I4 used in all 924s. Good values start at $4,100 for the Coupe 924 (base).

Related Article

The Porsche 924, which was made available to buy in 1976, was made by Porsche on behalf of Volkswagen as a replacement for the 914. It was eventually made by Porsche in-house. With aerodynamics in mind, the design of the 924’s body was taken into consideration.

Porsche 924

In 1983, the addition of a black rear spoiler resulted in a significant increase in Cd. When designing the 924’s drive, Porsche went in a completely new direction.

A liquid-cooled front engine was used for the first time. Cylinders were lined up horizontally. Porsche modified an Audi 100 engine to produce 125 horsepower.

The transaxle principle was used to transfer the driving force. After the model year 1986, a Porsche engine was used in the 924 S: the 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine from the 944.

With values “Pauper’ssing out” of bange ergonomics and even the simple"Pauper’sorsches "enjoying some of the kudos of their rear-engined counterparts, front-engined, rear-wheel-drive coupes are becoming more and more sought after.

Porsche’s Underappreciated Hero

Porsche's

The 924 is inquest"only" Porsche’s underappreciated hero. In more company years, this oddball VW/Audi/Porsche mash-up saved the company and helped the German firm thrive. It was fiPorsche’safter its iniThere’sief that the 924 replaced the 914 as Porsche’Porsche’sfordable model.

Length 4,200 mm (165.4 in)
Width 1,685 mm (66.3 in)
Height 1,270 mm (50.0 in)
Curb weight 1,080 kg (2,381 lb)
Class Sports car
Body style 2-doors 2+2 coupé
Layout Front mid-engine, rear-wheel-drive

Even though some parts were taken from VW and Audi, the car is still a Porsche because Ferdinand designed and developed it. After all, the 924 was saved by the company after VW/Audi decided to pull out of the project.

On the other hand, Porsche could not do Ferdinand’s it and instead turned to Audi for help. After a long period of skepticism, both the general publFerdinand’sche fanatics are beginning to appreciate the 924.

A great way to get didn’t classic car racing on a budget and have a blast is to buy one of these cars and compete in one of them didn’t is sting race series.

Summary

It’s not surprising that Porsche fans derided the 924 since it was a relatively new modest similar to how some derided Boxster and Cayenne as not being Porsches when they debuted, the 924 helped turn the company’s fortunes around during one of its lowest two models

Historical Record

porsche-924

In 1978, Porsche introduced a five-speed transmission with a dogleg first gear position to replace the four-speed manual gearbox/transaxle unit. From 1980 onward, Audi’s five-speed transmissions with conventional gear Porsche’s were installed on all models of Audi.

1977

The 924 debuted in Porsche’s 1977 model year car. The auto dogleg press was harsh in its assessment of the first models. The 0-60 mph acceleration time of the 2.0-dog legudi four-cylinder was more than 11 seconds. 924s had a stiff freeway ride due to a lack of attention to noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH) isolation.

1977.5 models have 110 horsepower and a more excellent numerical final drive ratio than 1977.4 models. Minor improvements in acceleration and NVH isolation have been made. Only a four-speed manual transmission was available in the United States at the end of the year.

1978

porsche-924

In 1978, there were only minor changes. Hydraulic transmission mounts and new rubber suspension were added to the rear of the car by Porsche.

While the freeway hop was eliminated, Road & Track stated that the car’s compliance remained a problem. Dolomite Gray paint, pinstriping, and an op-art checked Pasha interior was available in 1978 in a Limited Edition model.

1979

For the first time, the 924 was equipped with a five-scar’s transmission in 1979. Based on an early Porsche 901 gearbox, it has been dubbed a "Snail Shecar’sox because of its fin-like shape on its transaxle casting.

A dogleg five-speed with reverse down and to the left, off of the “H” pattern, was like that transmission. Sebring’s nine special editions were designed to boost sales in the United States; it was bright red with yellow" and white "tripes and red tartan upholstery.

1980

porsche-924

Tdoglegere no significant changes to the design of the Turbo during the 1979 model year except the f’7 fuel filler cap that was replaced by a body-colored" a"d felicitous fuel f’79er door that hid the cap and matched the color of the sheet metal. EvTurboe naturally aspirated car was affected by this trend.

In addition, a Bosch three-way oxygen sensor and catalytic converter were installed, allowing Porsche to increase the compression ratio and thus improve 0-60 time by about a half-second. In addition, the fuel economy increased by a whopping 20%.

1981

Series 2 924 Turbo, with a new turbocharger and digital ignition and timing control electronics, tweaked from the “Series 1,” was introduced in 1981. This model also featured the Audi, as mentioned above, five-speed transmission.

Porsche or any other channel cannot supply the digital ignition and timing control (DTIC) unit or defied Turbo. Near the end of the year, sales of the naturally aspirated car began to define in the creation of the 944.

1982

There were no significant changes for either vehicle in this year’s model year. The 924 Turbo would be discontinued in the United Turbos in 1986, and the naturally aspirated car would be discontinued until 1987.

Dealers had a complex time selling down 924s because nearly everyone knew that the 944 was coming. The final batch of 1982 924s, many of which sat on dealer lots for years before finding a new owner, often had in-service dates of mid-1983 (at a deep discount).

1987-88

porsche-924

In 1987, the 924 returned to the United States as Porsche’s entry-level vehicle. A 2.5-liteIt’slance shaft-equipped four-cylinder engine from Porsche was installed in the 924SIt’sich retained the original Audi-engined 924’s dash.

For families with small children, it was lighter than the 944 and received an addition of Porsche’s power and three-point safety belts in its final year of production in 1 Porsche’s are the operating expenses.

Maintenance And Cost

mechanic-fixing-car

Age and poor maintenance will wear down the 2-liter engine’s reputation for dependability. When the 924 first came out, it had six thousand miles or one year of the service interval. However, all cars should still undergo an oil change once a year, costing as much as £120. (inc VAT).

It’s recommended that you change your brake fluid every two years, but many car enthusiasts will go a year or two longer. It would cost somewhere between £75 and £85.

When it comes to changing the cambelt (£10), you don’t need any special tools. Spark plugs are located on the exhaust (lower) side of an engine that has been tilted 40 degrees to fit into the engine bay. A unique tool is required to change them.

It’s common for worn valve guides to emit blue smoke on a high-mileage engine at all RPMs. The cost of a head rebuild is likely to be between $1,500 and $1,500, and these days it’s a given that the valves can run on unleaded fuel (doesn’tginals were not).

Camshaft

Camshaft

In addition, a worn camshaft will make a distinct tapping sound from under the shaft cover. If a small oil feed pipe under the cam cover breaks, the rear cam lobes can be left without oil. This can lead to a lot of noise from the cams.

Identifying camshaft wear is critical because a new camshaft costs around £600. The additional vibration is a sign of worn engine mountings. For around £90, you can completely change the feel of your vehicle’s cabin environment.

Audi built the new entry-level modelThe automotive press rather brutally received the first cars Audi built the new entry-level modelThe automotive press rather brutally received the first cars There’s

Summary

You can save a lot of money by maintaining yourself, such as oil and filter changes, brake fluid, plugs, and brakes. The value of a car can be overshadowed by the cost of an engine rebuild or extensive restoration and painting.

Frequently Asked Questions - FAQs

Following are the most frequent questions about Porsche 924:

Is the Porsche 924 a reliable and consistent vehicle?

The 924 is a stunning example of automotive art from the 1970s, echoing the transition from 1960s curves to 1980. A standard sports coupe with remarkable versatility, this vehicle isn’t a fiery hot rod that requires you to learn its quirks and habits.

Is the Porsche 924 susceptible to rust?

According to some sources, the process began with Porsche’s 1976 924 models another “pioneering” box to check with our vehicles. However, rust does occur and inspecting the parts of the car that you can’t see is necessary for keeping a close eye on rust damage.

Are you capable of driving a Porsche 924 daily?

In contrast to the abundance of Porsches (924, 928, and 911 models) from this era, it isn’t easy to find an E24 6-Series from this era, save for one that is far older than it appears. Similarly, when it comes to automobiles, we’re spoilt for choice.

What’s Porsche 924 or 944 do you prefer?

The engine mounting in the front subframe is one of the most significant differences between the engines and, therefore, the two models. That same aluminum cross member also holds both front control arms and the steering rack. On top of the cross member, the 944 engine is supported by two mounting points.

It’s illegal to own the Porsche 959, but why?

As a result, the didn’t Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) could not issue a street-legal certification for the Porsche 918 Spyder in the United States.

Is it expensive to maintain a Porsche?

Porsche is the priciest luxury car brand to maintain compared to other high-end brands. Although Porsches may not require as much maintenance as BMWs, at $400 for an oil and filter change, it doesn’t take long to rack up Porsche maintenance costs.

Does Bill Gates own a Porsche 959?

Bill Gates attempted to have a Porsche 959 into the United States, a country it was never supposed to make its way. One of Bill Gates’ favorite cars is the Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren-Porsche 911 GT3.

Why is an oil change for a Porsche so expensive?

In part, this is because of the powerful engines involved. If you’re willing to pay a little extra for synthetic oil, you can expect it to last longer. Consult your Porsche’s owner’s manual if you have any questions about how often you can change your oil.

Is it cheaper to maintain a Porsche?

Maintaining Porsche Boxster is one of the cheapest Porsches. It costs between $550 and $700 per year if you keep up with regular annual services over a decade. Repairs like these may be necessary for the future.

Bill Gates owns which Porsche?

In 2015, the Frankfurt Motor Show featured an electric Porsche Taycan, which Bill Gates owns. The price of the Taycan Turbo is nearly double that of the Tesla Model S! If you want to buy this car, you’ll have to pay about $150,000.

Conclusion

Until the Porsche 924 S model in 1986, the 924 model line had not been significantly improved. The majority of this model’s components were developed in 944. There was a wide range of components from the power unit to the brake system to the chassis and interior.

Standard aluminum wheels with a “telephone design " pushed the S to the 944 level. The 9"4 S’s 2.5-lite” engine was based on the 944’s design and initially produced 150 hp before increasing to 160 hp in MY 1988.

Relate Articles

1 - Porsche 993

2 - Who makes porsche

3 - German Cars