Wisdom teeth

Wisdom teeth are expected by majority of people to appear in their late teens or early adult years. However, whereas many people have one to four wisdom teeth, some do not have any. The third set of molars in the back of your mouth is your wisdom teeth.

Wisdom teeth

Do All People Have Wisdom Teeth?

The majority of people expect their wisdom teeth to appear in their late teens or early adult years. However, whereas many people have one to four wisdom teeth, some do not have any. The third set of molars in the back of your mouth is your wisdom teeth.

Wisdom teeth are common, but they can cause issues. As the teeth break through the gums, you may suffer pain. Wisdom teeth might become impacted below the gum line if there isn’t enough room in your mouth for them.

You may need to get them removed in either situation. Different people’s wisdom teeth erupt in different ways. Some people are born with partially erupted wisdom teeth, while others are born without them.

What Do Wisdom Teeth mean?

In clinical and dental jargon, wisdom teeth are referred to as the third set of molars. Humans have four wisdom teeth on average; however, some people only acquire one or two wisdom teeth, and in some circumstances, they may never form or be missing entirely.

They are the last teeth to erupt, appearing behind the last remaining teeth in the back of the mouth. These teeth were given their name because of the age at which they first appeared at the rear of the mouth, usually between the ages of 17 and 25, when a young person would be pursuing wisdom through further education.

Why are some people missing their wisdom teeth?

An X-ray of your mouth can reveal whether or not you have third molars. If you don’t have any wisdom teeth, you might be concerned that something is wrong with your dental health. But, in actuality, not having these molars is OK.

According to the Dental Research Journal Trusted Source, 5 to 37 percent of patients have one or more missing third molars. The cause is unknown, but it is possible that the missing of these teeth is due to genetics. You may not have wisdom teeth if one of your parents does not have them.

Environment, food, and chewing function are all factors that may influence the lack of wisdom teeth. However, just because you can’t see your wisdom teeth doesn’t mean they aren’t there. Wisdom teeth can become impacted or lodged in the gums at any time. As a result, they are unable to fully emerge.

Do All People Have Wisdom Teeth?

Wisdom teeth are not present in everyone. According to a study, up to 35% of adults have missing wisdom teeth.

There are two primary reasons why some people lack wisdom teeth:

  1. They are present but have not yet erupted. If wisdom teeth are impacted (don’t have enough room to grow), they may never erupt and remain dormant in the jawbone for years.

  2. The absence of wisdom teeth is inherited. According to a study conducted at Princeton University, evolution plays a significant effect on the lack of wisdom teeth. The study found that as the brain became larger over hundreds of thousands of years, the head could no longer handle a larger brain and an extra set of teeth.

As a result, a progressive change in jaw architecture prevents the formation of a third molar, which is no longer required because we mostly chew with our first and second molars, thus the absence of the third set will not prohibit you from eating normally.

The University of Pennsylvania uncovered a chromosomal abnormality termed MYH16 in another investigation. This mutation is thought to be an evolutionary characteristic that has allowed modern people to develop larger brains while simultaneously reducing the need for and space for wisdom teeth.

When do wisdom teeth start to erupt?

Wisdom teeth appear at various ages. Your third molars will usually appear between the ages of 17 and 21, while you are in your late teens or early adult years. Some people, on the other hand, obtain their wisdom teeth earlier than others. When you’re younger, it’s easier to get your wisdom teeth out.

Note that surgery can’t be scheduled later in life, but the bones around your gums are softer and the nerve roots in your mouth haven’t fully matured when you’re young. As a result, removing these teeth is much easier. Waiting till later can make removal more difficult and painful.

Purpose of wisdom teeth

Because the mouth only has a place for 28 teeth, wisdom teeth removal is a regular surgery. Overcrowding may occur if all four of your wisdom teeth erupt, resulting in 32 teeth. Wisdom teeth are thought to have functioned as replacement teeth for our forefathers.

Today, we eat soft or sensitive foods, and most individuals maintain decent mouth hygiene. Both of these characteristics contribute to lowering the likelihood of tooth loss. Because our forefathers ate a variety of foods, some of which were not as soft, and they did not have regular dental treatments, they may have experienced gum and tooth problems such as tooth decay or tooth loss.

If this is the case, wisdom teeth may have served as supplementary chewing teeth. Wisdom teeth are rarely used nowadays and often cause more harm than good. Humans grow their first set of teeth from birth to early adolescence, then lose them and grow a new set.

There is a small delay before the final set of teeth emerges in early adulthood. Because they are the last teeth to emerge, they are known as wisdom teeth. When these teeth come in, you’ll supposedly be “wiser.”

Summary

Wisdom Teeth are the third set of molars in the back of your mouth. They are the last teeth to erupt, appearing behind the last remaining teeth in the mouth. Some people only acquire one or two wisdom teeth, and in some circumstances, they may never form. Up to 35% of adults have missing wisdom teeth.

Complications of wisdom teeth

Of all, no rule says you have to extract wisdom teeth that appear, especially if your mouth isn’t too crowded. Even if their wisdom teeth are not causing problems, some patients opt for removal to avoid future complications.

And other people wait until they are in discomfort before seeking removal. If you put off removal because you aren’t experiencing any symptoms, you may need to arrange mouth surgery at some point. The longer wisdom teeth remain in the mouth, the more issues they cause.

The following are common wisdom tooth complications:

1. Toothache

Emerging wisdom teeth are often accompanied by pain in the rear of the mouth. Mild and sporadic tooth pain is common at first. The gums in the rear of your mouth may ache for a few days before disappearing. This can recur intermittently over months or years. However, pain can gradually worsen to the point that chewing or speaking becomes impossible. The tooth pressing on the nerves in the mouth causes pain.

2. Redness and swelling

Redness or swelling in the gums around your third molars are also indicators of a growing wisdom tooth, in addition to pain.

3. A damaged tooth

Wisdom teeth can become caught beneath the gum line when your jaw bone and other teeth prevent them from coming in. This can result in significant mouth pain. Pain around your molars is another indicator of an impacted wisdom tooth, but there is no sign of a developing tooth. A cyst in the back of your mouth is also possible.

4. Infections of the mouth

Bacteria can become stuck in your gums as your wisdom teeth develop, leading to an mouth infection.

Signs of an infection include:

  • Pain

  • Redness

  • Swelling

  • Tenderness in your jaw

  • Bad breath

  • A foul taste in the mouth

5. Cavities

Food can also become caught in the gums around third molars, causing a cavity on the developing tooth. Because there isn’t enough area to brush or floss in front of wisdom teeth, they can develop cavities.

6. Teeth shifting

When there isn’t enough room in your mouth for wisdom teeth to emerge, other teeth may shift out of place. They may become crooked or misaligned.

When should you see a doctor?

See your dentist if you have dental pain or notice a developing wisdom tooth. X-rays can be used by your dentist to establish how many wisdom teeth you have. If you don’t currently have a dentist, the Health line Find Care feature can help you find one in your region. When you have discomfort or other issues, your dentist will most likely recommend that you see a surgeon.

This lowers the chance of problems such as:

  • Infections

  • Bone loss

  • Nerve pain

  • Cavities

  • Teeth moving

Your dentist may monitor your wisdom teeth and recommend removal at a later date if they aren’t producing any concerns or complications. However, wisdom tooth removal becomes more difficult as you get older. So, if you’re having issues, get rid of the problematic teeth as soon as possible.

How often do people get wisdom teeth?

All of a person’s teeth are present at birth and are located higher up in the skull structure. A set of 20 baby teeth erupts first, then falls out. After that, 32 permanent teeth emerge. The first set of molars appears around the age of 6, the second set around the age of 12, and the last set (wisdom teeth) at the age of 21.

Wisdom teeth were once necessary for an early human diet of roots, leaves, meat, and nuts, but they are no longer required. Humans may now soften food by cooking it and cutting and crushing it with cutlery. Some people may never grow wisdom teeth, according to anthropologists, since humans have evolved past the necessity for them.

Wisdom teeth may follow the path of the appendix and become obsolete. Some researchers believe that one day there will be no need for wisdom teeth. Even yet, most adults grow wisdom teeth due to heredity. According to one study, at least 53% of adults have at least one wisdom teeth that have come in. Men were more likely than women to have them.

The fact that you can’t see all of your wisdom teeth doesn’t imply they aren’t there. Wisdom teeth do not always erupt and are not always noticeable. If you have wisdom teeth under your gums, an X-ray can confirm it.

Wisdom teeth, whether visible or not, can create mouth health issues. Impacted wisdom teeth are those that haven’t broken through the gum line. This can sometimes cause even more complications than the presence of wisdom teeth.

Summary

The longer wisdom teeth remain in the mouth, the more likely they are to cause problems. Toothache, redness, and swelling can all be indicators of a growing wisdom tooth. At least 53% of adults have at least one wisdom tooth that has come in, according to one study. Your dentist may monitor your wisdom teeth and recommend removal at a later date.

What is the purpose of wisdom teeth extraction?

Humans and their jaws have shrunk over time. This evolutionary development is likely due to several factors. According to some scientists, as the human brain grew larger throughout time, the jaw shrank to make room.

Our dental and dietary needs have also changed dramatically. Because humans have smaller jaws, there isn’t always enough room in the mouth for all of our teeth. There are two top wisdom teeth and two bottom wisdom teeth in total. People can have one, two, three, or all four wisdom teeth.

Most people’s jaws stop developing around the age of 18, although wisdom teeth usually appear around the age of 19.5 years. The majority of wisdom tooth problems are caused by their failure to fit properly.

Wisdom teeth can lead to a number of problems, including:

  • Crooked teeth

  • Crowded teeth

  • Wisdom teeth growing in sideways

  • Increased tooth decay

  • Jaw pain

  • Cysts under the gums and possibly tumors

If any of the above changes are noticeable, the American Dental Association recommends extraction. It is advised that teenagers be assessed for wisdom tooth extraction surgery. Because the roots and bone have not fully matured, people who have their wisdom teeth removed while they are younger have a faster healing time.

This can assist prevent problems from arising in the first place. When it comes to surgery, there are always dangers, so be sure to ask a lot of questions when deciding whether or not to have these teeth removed. If you elect not to have your wisdom teeth removed, your dentist will need to keep a constant eye on them. Wisdom teeth grow increasingly bothersome over time.

Wisdom tooth removal is sometimes recommended before any orthodontic work, such as braces, to guarantee that these teeth don’t erupt later and destroy all of the hard work that has gone into molding your jaw and teeth. A dentist or maxillofacial surgeon can extract your wisdom teeth. They’ll walk you through how to prepare for surgery and what to expect during recuperation.

Wisdom teeth can regrow after they’ve been removed

Wisdom teeth do not regrow after being extracted. It is conceivable, however, for a person to have more than four wisdom teeth. Supernumerary teeth are extra teeth that can erupt after your initial wisdom teeth have been taken.

According to a 2015 research of more than 7,300 adults, having extra teeth is a 2 percent possibility. They can appear anywhere in the mouth and are usually detectable on normal dental X-rays, so they aren’t a surprise. Continue reading to find out more about wisdom teeth, their function, and why they’re usually extracted.

Should I worry about wisdom teeth?

Your dentist will keep an eye on your wisdom teeth, looking for:

  • Wisdom teeth that are positioned incorrectly. If wisdom teeth are positioned incorrectly, they can trap food and create an environment conducive to the growth of cavity-causing germs.

  • Wisdom teeth that haven’t fully erupted. Crooked teeth make flossing and cleaning between the second molar and wisdom tooth difficult.

  • Wisdom teeth that haven’t fully emerged. Bacteria can infiltrate the gums through partial eruptions, which can lead to illness. Your gums could get infected and swollen.

  • Insufficient space for wisdom teeth Teeth with insufficient space may crowd or harm neighboring teeth when they emerge.

An impacted wisdom tooth might cause a cyst, which can harm the surrounding teeth’s roots and your jawbone.

FAQ’s

Following are some of the important questions:

1. Does not everyone have wisdom teeth?

However, whereas many people have one to four wisdom teeth, some do not have any. The third set of molars in the back of your mouth is your wisdom teeth. Although wisdom teeth are common, they can cause problems. As the teeth break through the gums, you may suffer pain.

2. Is it rare to have all 4 wisdom teeth?

No, having all four wisdom teeth is not uncommon; in fact, having four wisdom teeth is the most frequent. Some patients have fewer than four, while others have more. The extra wisdom teeth are referred to as supernumerary teeth in this case.

3. Can wisdom teeth never come in?

Wisdom teeth are not a problem for everyone. Some people are born without all of their teeth, and statistics reveal that about a third of the population is born without any. Even if some people have teeth, they never see them erupt.

4. Can wisdom teeth come in after 30?

Although wisdom tooth growth after the age of 30 is highly unusual, a person over the age of 30 may have wisdom tooth growth in rare instances.

5. What is the oldest age you can get wisdom teeth?

Wisdom teeth, also known as third molars (M3s), are the last permanent teeth to erupt. They commonly appear in the mouth between the ages of 17 and 25. However, they can rupture many years later.

6. Is tooth 1 a wisdom tooth?

The first tooth in the Tooth Numbering System is your upper right wisdom tooth. The third molar (wisdom teeth) on the left side of the mouth (#16) is the last tooth to go up one number. The lower left wisdom tooth will be #17, and the lower right wisdom tooth will be #32, going clockwise.

7. What race does not have wisdom teeth?

However, the Inuit, a people who reside in the Arctic areas of Canada, Greenland, and Alaska, have the fewest wisdom teeth, with roughly 45 percent without one or more third molars, according to him. There are most likely a few explanations for this.

8. What percent of the population has their wisdom teeth removed?

Wisdom tooth extraction is a very common operation. More than 90% of Americans have their wisdom teeth extracted. While wisdom teeth surgery may not be essential in some cases, it is frequently recommended to avoid future issues and suffering.

9. What is the number 14 tooth?

1st Molar number 14, Number 15 is the second molar. Number 16 is the wisdom tooth or third molar. Number 17: Wisdom tooth or third molar (lower left)

10. Do wisdom teeth have a purpose?

According to anthropologists, our ancestors used the last set of molars, or wisdom teeth, to aid in the chewing of coarse, rough foods such as nuts, roots, meats, and leaves.

Conclusion

Wisdom Teeth are the third set of molars in the back of your mouth. They are the last teeth to erupt, appearing behind the last remaining teeth in the mouth. Some people only acquire one or two wisdom teeth, and in some circumstances, they may never form. Up to 35% of adults have missing wisdom teeth. Wisdom teeth are thought to have functioned as replacement teeth for our forefathers.

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