Does Everyone Have Wisdom Teeth

Does everyone have wisdom teeth? No, not everyone has wisdom teeth. The majority of young people get their wisdom teeth between the ages of 17 and 21. Wisdom teeth develop as young people enter college and begin to learn to be self-sufficient. Many individuals will have four wisdom teeth. However, it is also common to have fewer or none at all. The situation is already congested by the moment the wisdom teeth appear. Wisdom teeth aren’t a problem for everyone. Some individuals are born without all of their teeth, and statistics indicate that around a third of the population is born without any. Even though some individuals have teeth, they don’t ever see them erupt.

What are Wisdom Teeth?

Wisdom teeth aren’t meant to make you smarter. They received their name from the fact that they developed on the verge of maturity. The third and last molars to develop in the mouth are wisdom teeth. Between the ages of 17 and 25, they typically do so.

Teeth erupt in phases, beginning with the incisors and canines and progressing to the premolars and molars. A child’s first set of teeth will grow in, then fall out and be replaced by a new set. Wisdom teeth are the final set of teeth to emerge, and they grow at the rear of the mouth.

The majority of young people get their wisdom teeth between the ages of 17 and 21. Wisdom teeth develop as young people enter college and begin to learn to be self-sufficient. Many individuals will have four wisdom teeth. However, it is also common to have fewer or none at all. The situation is already congested by the period the wisdom teeth appear.

Where Would I Be If My Wisdom Teeth Had Not Erupted?

Wisdom teeth may get stuck in the jawbone or beneath the tissues and fail to emerge completely. When wisdom teeth fail to emerge properly, they may become impacted, causing infection, nerve damage, and discomfort.

The main cause of wisdom teeth that do not erupt is a lack of space in the mouth cavity. A neighbouring second molar may also prevent wisdom teeth from erupting. If your wisdom molars have not yet erupted, your dentists will utilize X-rays and clinical exams to predict when they may erupt and if removal is required.

When Should You See Your Dentist?

Every individual is unique. Therefore you won’t be able to predict when your wisdom teeth will erupt. Although some individuals may not experience discomfort, the most frequent symptom of affected wisdom teeth is discomfort at the back of the mouth. While some gum or jaw discomfort is to be expected, severe pain may suggest an abscessed tooth.

The removal of wisdom teeth lowers the risk of:

  • Infection

  • Cavities

  • Bone support is lost.

  • Pain in the nerves

  • Teeth shifting

Expectations During Removal:

Even if your wisdom teeth aren’t bothering you, most dentists suggest having them removed. While they may exist without causing difficulties in your mouth, they may create issues later if they’re more difficult to remove.

An X-ray will be used by your dentist to assess where your wisdom teeth are positioned and if there is enough room for them to develop. The extraction procedure is simple and is performed under anaesthetic.

If your tooth has not completely sprouted, the dentist will reach it via a tiny incision in your gum. To make removal simpler, the actual doctor may break the teeth into smaller pieces. They may also have to remove any bone that is obstructing access to the natural tooth.

Pain, inflammation, and bleeding are to be expected, and you must not clean for 24 hours. During this period, you should eat soft foods and avoid using cigarettes for a minimum of 72 hours.

Complications that are common include:

1. Swelling and redness:

Once your wisdom teeth emerge through your gums, you may anticipate some swelling. If there are retained food particles surrounding the region, the swelling may increase. It’s advisable to see your dentist if it doesn’t go away after applying cold compresses.

2. Pain:

As your wisdom teeth emerge, you will most likely feel some discomfort. Gum disease, fractures, or cysts may all-cause discomfort, which a dentist can diagnose. Some individuals may experience pressure or a pounding sensation in the back of their mouth.

3. Impaction:

Wisdom teeth that are locked under the gum line or in the jaw may become impacted very rapidly. Food and germs may become stuck in partly erupted wisdom teeth, causing deterioration. If you have difficulty opening your gaping mouth or have foul breath, see a dentist.

4. Infection:

Food particles may get trapped in the gums surrounding partially erupted wisdom teeth, causing infection. Pericoronitis is a kind of illness that causes swollen gums.

5. Crowding:

Wisdom teeth often do not have enough room to develop properly, resulting in an overpopulation of the oral cavity. Your wisdom teeth may also force your other teeth around, causing further problems.

Summary:

Teeth erupt in phases, beginning with the incisors and canines and progressing to the premolars and molars. Wisdom teeth are the final set of teeth to emerge, and they grow at the rear of the mouth. Majority of young people get their wisdom teeth between the ages 17 and 21. Wisdom teeth that do not erupt is a lack of space in the mouth cavity. If your wisdom molars have not yet erupted, your dentist will use X-rays to predict when they may erupt and if removal is required. The extraction procedure is simple and is performed under anaesthetic.

Why aren’t all individuals born with wisdom teeth?

An X-ray of your mouth may show whether or not you have tertiary molars. If you don’t have any wisdom teeth, you may be concerned that something is wrong with your dental health. But, in fact, not having these molars is absolutely OK.

As per the Dental Research Journal Trusted Reference, anywhere between 5% and 37% of individuals lack one or more of their molar teeth. The cause is unclear, although it is possible that the absence of these teeth is due to heredity. So, if one of your grandparents doesn’t have wisdom teeth, it’s possible that you won’t either.

Environment, nutrition, and chewing function may also play a role in the absence of wisdom teeth. These third sets of molars were previously necessary for an early human diet of nuts, tubers, meat, and leaves, but they are no longer required. Today’s diet consists of softer, easier-to-crush foods. So, if we don’t need them, why do we have them?

According to research, adult teeth are a remnant of human evolution. Because of advancements in culinary technology, individuals can now make softer foods, obviating the need for wisdom teeth. Lineage and genetics are also thought to have a role in the quantity of wisdom teeth. East Asians and African Americans, for example, are more likely than Europeans to have fewer than four wisdom teeth. An X-ray will be used by your dentist to establish whether you have wisdom teeth.

However, just because you can’t feel your wisdom teeth doesn’t mean they aren’t there. Wisdom teeth may become impacted or trapped in the gums at any moment. As a consequence, they are unable to emerge completely.

A dental X-ray may identify an impacted tooth even if you can’t see your wisdom teeth. To prevent gum diseases and discomfort, your dentist may suggest a tooth extraction. Alternatively, your dentist may keep an eye on your molars and only replace an impacted wisdom tooth if it becomes problematic.

When do wisdom teeth start to erupt?

Wisdom teeth appear at various ages. Your third molars will usually appear between the ages of 17 and 21, while you are in your teenage years or early adult years. Some individuals, on the other hand, acquire their wisdom teeth sooner, while others get them later.

When you’re younger, it’s simpler to get your wisdom teeth removed. Not that you can’t require surgery early in adulthood, but the bones surrounding your gums are thinner, and the nerve fibres in your mouth haven’t fully developed when you’re young. As a consequence, removing these teeth is much simpler. If you wait too long, the removal process can be more difficult and painful.

What are the advantages and disadvantages of wisdom teeth?

Because the mouth only has space for 28 teeth, wisdom teeth extraction is a frequent treatment. Overcrowding may occur if all four of your third molars erupt, resulting in 32 teeth.

What are the benefits of wisdom teeth, given that the face only has room for approximately 28 teeth?

Wisdom teeth are said to have acted as tooth replacements for our forefathers. Today, we consume soft or delicate meals, and most individuals maintain excellent mouth hygiene. Both of these variables assist in decreasing the risk of tooth loss.

Because our forefathers ate a variety of foods — perhaps not as soft — and didn’t have regular dental visits, they may have had gum and tooth issues such as dental caries or tooth loss. If this is the case, wisdom teeth may have served as additional chewing teeth. Wisdom teeth are no longer useful, and they frequently do more damage than good.

Five Interesting Facts About Wisdom Teeth

You’ve undoubtedly heard of wisdom teeth, and you’ve probably heard of wisdom teeth removal. Yet that’s just about the limit of most people’s wisdom tooth knowledge. Here seem to be five wisdom teeth facts to help you learn more about the final set of teeth that many people acquire.

1. For thousands of years, wisdom teeth have been useless.

Fresh meats, roots, herbs, and other foraged items were staples of ancient people’s diets. To chop up these difficult meals, as well as capture, dismember, and eat them, strong teeth were required. Having more teeth was a great benefit, particularly because there was no surgeon to maintain teeth healthy. People have developed since then, and we now have a more sophisticated menu. This implies we don’t need these additional teeth to live and break up difficult meals.

2. Problems with wisdom teeth

Third molars, or wisdom teeth, typically develop between the ages of 17 and 25. While it varies, these teeth often create difficulties when they first emerge. Because most people’s jaws are too tiny, wisdom teeth may get obstructed and unable to burst through their gums. Some people’s wisdom teeth only partially break past their gums, resulting in a flap that traps germs in their mouth. Infections and other problems may result as a result of this. Infections, damage to neighbouring teeth, and even cysts may result from impacted teach. Another issue with adult teeth is that they are difficult to clean since they are so far back. Dental caries and infections are also increased as a result of this. You may avoid all of these issues and more by getting your wisdom teeth removed.

3. The amount of wisdom teeth a person has varied from one individual to the next.

Some individuals only have one wisdom teeth, whereas others have several, three, four, or none. It’s not uncommon for a person to have more than four adult teeth. The additional teeth are referred to as supernumerary teeth in this case. The number of wisdom teeth you grow is also influenced by your genetics. According to studies, at least 53% of individuals have at minimum one wisdom teeth that have erupted. If you don’t have any wisdom teeth, it doesn’t imply they aren’t there. Wisdom teeth don’t always erupt and won’t always erupt.

4. Every tooth has a different number of roots.

The roots of your teeth are the first to develop. The next push is the visible portion of the bud, which is evident in your mouth through your gums. The roots of most wisdom teeth are two to three, although there may be more. As a result, if your smart teeth need to be extracted, it’s simpler to do something before the roots take hold. Surgeons, on the other hand, like to leave some roots on the molars when they extract them. Because extracting a small tooth bud may be challenging, a root provides them with something to grip.

5. Your wisdom teeth have the potential to erupt at any moment.

Wisdom teeth usually emerge between the ages of 17 and 25. The oldest individual to develop a wisdom tooth, according to Guinness World Records, was 94 years old. Wisdom teeth may erupt at any moment, but they have been doing so for quite some time. A 25- to a 35-year-old girl who died 13,000 to fifteen thousand years ago had the oldest documented instance of impacted wisdom teeth.

You may share what you’ve learned about wisdom teeth with others now that you’ve learned more about them. Simply Wisdom Teeth is the place to go if you need your wisdom teeth removed. We are always glad to address any questions or issues you may have, so please don’t hesitate to get in touch with us.

Summary:

Wisdom teeth are said to have acted as tooth replacements for our forefathers. Ancient people ate a variety of foods and didn’t have regular dental visits, resulting in gum and tooth issues such as dental caries or tooth loss. The amount of wisdom teeth a person has varied from one individual to the next. Wisdom teeth, or third molars, typically develop between the ages of 17 and 25.

What is the origin of the term “wisdom teeth”?

Wisdom teeth get their name from the age at which they most often emerge. They usually appear between the ages of 17 and 21, when many people are going to college and learning things beyond high school.

Wisdom teeth are removed for a variety of reasons.

Approximately 60% of individuals choose to have their teeth removed, owing to the fact that many of them develop at an angle and may create future issues.

Some people’s teeth grow absolutely straight and may be seen without intervention. Others don’t have enough space in their mouths, or their wisdom teeth only partially erupt through the gums.

These incorrectly oriented teeth, called obstructed wisdom teeth, may cause problems with tooth alignment and potentially damage the jaw. They are also more prone to typical dental problems like decay and plaque.

Why do we have wisdom teeth if we don’t need them?

Wisdom teeth, according to research, are an internal remnant from a different period in human history. Humans used to consume roots, uncooked meats, and hard leaves—foods that are no longer available.

This required a lot of ripping and crushing. As a result, human ancestors had a bigger jaw and greater tooth space. The human body changed as eating habits changed, thus removing the necessity for a third pair of molars.

Enrolling in a plan that includes yearly and regular treatment will let you get better acquainted with your smile. Now is the time to choose the best dental plan for you.

How can you know whether your wisdom teeth are erupting?

Although some wisdom teeth emerge without creating issues, others emerge at an angle and press on the gums or the tooth next to them. This is referred to as impaction.

Wisdom tooth impaction may result in a variety of symptoms, such as jaw discomfort or swelling, gum disease, and headaches. In addition, wisdom teeth that are impacted may infect the gums.

The following are symptoms of gum infections are caused by wisdom teeth:

  • Inflamed and red gums around the wisdom teeth

  • Swelling

  • Pain

  • Pus oozing out of the gums

  • Lymph nodes under the jaw that are swollen and painful

  • Difficulty swallowing and opening the mouth.

  • Fever

  • Nasty breath

Whether you’re having any of these symptoms, make an appointment with your National Dental Care dentist right away to check if they’re being caused by your adult teeth.

What Is The Wisdom Tooth Extraction Procedure Like?

When your dentist recommends that you have your wisdom tooth or tooth removed, it is a very simple, fast, and painless procedure to follow. Your dentist will take an X-ray of your jaw to get a clearer picture of where the tooth is in relation to the rest of your mouth so that they can determine the best way to remove it.

To relieve the discomfort, you’ll be given a general anaesthetic. To extract the oral, the dentist will gently tug on it while rocking it back and forth, hoping to expand the tooth socket enough for the tooth to come free. It’s possible that you’ll feel some pressure while they do so. They may make a small incision into your mouth to assist release the tooth if required.

The whole procedure may take anything from the first few minutes to twenty minutes. At Buttercup, we don’t begin until the anaesthesia has fully taken effect. In other words, other than the strange feeling when we rock it out, you shouldn’t feel any discomfort.

Will wisdom teeth are phased out?

With the number of persons without wisdom teeth constantly increasing, it’s conceivable that we’ll one day evolve to the point where we don’t need them at all. The growth of wisdom teeth has been chemically prevented by scientists. Children aged 2 to 6 who are given a local anaesthetic for dental treatment had a greater likelihood of not acquiring wisdom teeth later on, according to research. Perhaps, in the future, inexpensive injections given at an early age can prevent us all from having to have wisdom teeth removed!

When do wisdom teeth begin to erupt beyond the age of 30?

One of the most often asked questions we get as dentists are, “Can wisdom teeth develop beyond 30?” Sometimes is the answer.

Wisdom teeth, also known as third molars, usually emerge between the ages of eighteen and 20. This may be a lengthy and difficult process, but it generally ends before the age of 30. Although wisdom teeth development beyond the age of 30 is very unusual, a person over the age of 30 may suffer wisdom tooth growth in rare instances.

Wisdom Teeth Problems After 30

Because wisdom teeth typically emerge at a younger age, most individuals have them extracted between the ages of 14 and 30. Some individuals never have their wisdom teeth extracted, and if they aren’t bothering them or creating issues, there’s no reason to be concerned. Wisdom teeth, either erupted or still concealed, may become a source of worry beyond the age of 30. Knowing about these possible issues when wisdom teeth emerge later in life may help you decide whether to seek treatment:

  • Bacterial breeding ground - wisdom teeth that stay concealed and unerupted at the rear of the mouth may serve as a breeding ground for germs, resulting in painful, deep cavities. Brushing and flossing the back of the mouth is more difficult, allowing cavities to fester if not addressed.

  • Tissue damage - wisdom teeth that have partly erupted may be very painful. These partly erupted wisdom teeth may quickly get infected owing to retained food and the complexity of cleaning them, in addition to the discomfort from swollen and damaged tissue.

  • Long-term discomfort — many individuals put up with wisdom teeth pain for a long time, thinking that it would go out on its own. Regrettably, this is not always the case. Wisdom teeth extraction may help you live a happier, healthier life by removing your wisdom teeth.

Age Wisdom teeth
Around age 9 Wisdom teeth begin to emerge from the jawbones. The jaw has a long way to go in terms of development. As a result, they have not been at full density.
Late teenage The roots of wisdom teeth have grown and are becoming longer. Each wisdom tooth’s crown may begin to emerge.
The early 20s Each wisdom teeth has erupted or is on the verge of doing so (is impacted). It’s possible that the roots are still developing. The jawbones have reached the end of their growth cycle.
Around 40 and above The wisdom teeth’ roots are firmly embedded in the bone. The density of the jawbones has reached adult levels.

After 30 years, wisdom teeth are removed.

While wisdom teeth are usually extracted well before the age of 30, it is not too late to have them removed later in life if they are creating issues. The older we grow, the more time it lasts for our bodies to heal and recover after surgery. The removal of wisdom teeth is no exception. It’s possible that you’ll need to budget additional time for recuperation since it may take up to a week to feel normal again after getting your wisdom teeth pulled. And, if you’re going to the trouble of having wisdom teeth pulled, it’s better to have them all out at once because you don’t have to do it again later in life.

Utah Oral & Facial Surgery is here to assist you.

Wisdom teeth develop at varying rates for each person and maybe extracted at any moment. Are you above the age of 30 and concerned that your wisdom teeth have never been removed? Let us assist you in putting your mind at rest. Oral & Cosmetic Surgery of Utah’s board-qualified oral surgeons may examine them and determine if they need to be removed. Make an appointment for your free consultation now! Cottonwood Heights, South Jordan, and Tooele, Utah are all home to our offices.

Noneruption of Wisdom Teeth: What Causes It?

1. Wisdom teeth are missing.

The dentition of humans has changed throughout time. To consume coarse foods and chew raw flesh, ancient humans needed larger teeth. However, contemporary man consumes more prepared, processed, and refined foods, reducing the need for additional teeth.

The third molar teeth have become redundant as a consequence of this change in feeding habits. According to studies, about 35% of people will ultimately cease growing wisdom teeth. According to some doctors, wisdom teeth will eventually disappear from the jawline.

2. The eruption of third molars is delayed.

Wisdom teeth do not always sprout in early adulthood. It is also not necessary for all third molars to sprout at the same time. Wisdom teeth have been seen to emerge in individuals as late as their late 40s or even their early 50s. The cause of the late burst is still a source of debate among experts, and it remains unknown to this day.

3. There isn’t enough room in the mouth.

An impacted tooth may occur for a variety of reasons, one of which being a lack of room in the buccal mucosa. The human dental arch has shrunk through time, but since the third molar is the final tooth to erupt in the oral mucosa, there may not be enough room for it to do so.

Genetics is sometimes blamed for a narrow or tiny arch. It’s possible that inheriting a smaller or thinner arch or broad third molars from one or both parents contributes to wisdom teeth not erupting.

4. The tooth is angled incorrectly.

The second major reason is the wisdom tooth’s incorrect placement inside the lower jaw. The teeth may be positioned incorrectly, preventing them from erupting.

As described below, the reasons for an impacted tooth may be classified into two categories: local and systemic.

Local Causes:

A neighbouring second molar tooth may sometimes serve as a barrier, preventing the eruption of third molar teeth. A robust and thick bone surrounding the wisdom teeth may potentially hinder it from erupting.

In certain instances, the tooth’s eruption is hampered by a shortage of room in the dental arch. The existence of supernumerary (extra) teeth that use the space available for wisdom teeth, maintained primary teeth (where some primary teeth do not shed and remain intact), a non-absorbing bone trying to cover the wisdom tooth, an unusual position of the wisdom tooth’s tooth bud that prevents its eruption, trauma to the wisdom teeth’s roots, and an abnormal position of the wisdom teeth’s tooth bud that prevents its eruption are some of the other causes.

Causes at the Systemic Level

There are a number of medical or genetic factors that may prevent wisdom teeth from erupting.

Individuals with illnesses such as rickets, anaemia, TB, and congenital syphilis have been documented to have impacted teeth. Endocrine diseases such as parathyroid disease, hypothyroidism, and achondroplasia may also cause third molar tooth impactions. These medical disorders cause reduced osteoclastic activity, which prevents the bone around the third molar teeth from dissolving.

Some genetic diseases, including Down’s syndrome and cleft palate, cause less assimilation of the overlying bone and, in some cases, result in the loss of the third molar teeth’s eruption route.

Summary:

About 35% of people will ultimately cease growing wisdom teeth. An impacted tooth may occur for a variety of reasons, one of which is a lack of room in the oral mucosa. Oral & Cosmetic Surgery of Utah’s board-qualified oral surgeons may examine them and determine if they need to be removed. Make an appointment for a free consultation now!

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS:

People usually ask the following questions about wisdom teeth:

1. Is it common not to have wisdom teeth?

Wisdom teeth aren’t a problem for everyone. Some individuals are born without all of their teeth, and statistics indicate that around a third of the population is born without any. Even though some individuals have teeth, they never get to see them erupt.

2. What if you never acquire your wisdom teeth?

If you don’t get your wisdom teeth out, a partially erupted wisdom tooth may cause pericoronitis, a bacterial infection. Conversely, a wisdom tooth that fails to erupt may cause a cyst, which can cause bone and gum tissue damage. Wisdom teeth are often pulled because they emerge crooked.

3. What is the oldest age at which wisdom teeth may be extracted?

Although wisdom teeth extraction is best done before the age of 25, it may be done at any age. Wisdom teeth removal may be required in older people if the molar has become affected or diseased. A wisdom tooth that is impacted is one that does not have enough room to emerge properly from the gums.

4. When do wisdom teeth begin to erupt?

Wisdom teeth, also known as third molars (M3s), are the final permanent teeth to emerge and are the farthest back in the mouth. They typically appear in the mouth between the ages of 17 and 25. They may, however, explode after a long period of time. The majority of people have four M3s; nevertheless, 8% of the population of the UK has one or no M3s.

5. Is having all four wisdom teeth unusual?

Some individuals only have one wisdom teeth, whereas others have multiple, three, four, or none. It’s not uncommon for a person to get more than four wisdom teeth. The additional teeth are referred to as supernumerary teeth in this case. The number of wisdom teeth you grow is also influenced by your genetics.

6. How does wisdom tooth extraction impact the brain?

When impacted teeth get infected, the infection may spread to the sinuses, the brain, and the circulatory system. If left untreated, this may cause heart attacks, brain damage, and even death.

7. Does the removal of wisdom teeth alter the contour of your face?

You’ll be relieved to learn that wisdom tooth removal is unlikely to alter the contour of your face. In reality, the advantages of wisdom tooth extractions much exceed the possibility that your facial shape may alter as a result of the operation.

8. How does the removal of wisdom teeth impact one’s vision?

The majority of individuals think that tooth extraction has an impact on eyesight. Unfortunately, there is no proof that tooth extraction causes eyesight loss.

9. Is it necessary to remove wisdom teeth?

As per the American Dental Association, adult teeth extraction may be required if you notice changes in the region of those teeth, such as pain. Infection of the tendons behind the final bottom tooth on many occasions.

10. Can wisdom teeth make you deaf?

While wisdom teeth cannot cause hearing loss, they may be linked to hearing loss if they become a source of infection. If you’re having issues with your wisdom teeth, make an appointment with your dentist straight immediately.

CONCLUSION:

Some individuals are missing their wisdom teeth. So, if you’re lucky enough not to have third molars, you may skip having them out. Unless you have wisdom teeth but they aren’t bothering you, continue to see your dentist every six months. Your dentist may keep an eye on these developing teeth and suggest extraction when necessary. There’s no need to be concerned if you don’t have wisdom teeth since many individuals don’t get them. Teeth usually emerge in early adolescence, but if they emerge later in life, they may create difficulties or become impacted. Because it’s not always obvious if adult teeth need to be removed, stay up with your dental cleanings visits for a professional assessment.

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