Writ of execution

Writ of execution,

Definition of Writ of execution:

  1. A judgment of possession is a court order that determines who is entitled to property. After a judgment of possession is rendered by the court, the judge may then issue a writ of execution to begin the transfer of property. The judgment for possession states the plaintiff has a right to the property; the writ of execution actually begins the transfer process from a judgment debtor to a plaintiff.

  2. A judicial order that a judgment be enforced.

  3. A writ of execution is a court order that puts in force a judgment of possession and directs law enforcement personnel to begin the transfer of property as the result of a legal judgment. Property may include assets, money, or real property.

  4. A court order authorizing an officer of the court to sell property of the defendant to satisfy a judgment.

How to use Writ of execution in a sentence?

  1. We think that the law of limitation of actions ought not to interfere with the rules in relation to execution, which currently provide for a period for issue of a writ of execution of six years, which may be extended with the leave of the court.
  2. A writ of execution is a court order that puts in force a judgment of possession and directs law enforcement personnel to begin the transfer of assets, money, or property as the result of a legal judgment.
  3. The judgment for possession states the plaintiff has a right to the property; the writ of execution actually begins the transfer process from a judgment debtor to a plaintiff.
  4. A writ of execution may be used in bankruptcy cases and in eviction cases (when a tenant will not leave on their own and will not pay rent).

Meaning of Writ of execution & Writ of execution Definition