What is the unit circle?

See description below.

Explanation:

In mathematics, a unit circle is a circle with a radius of one. In trigonometry, the unit circle is the circle of radius one centered at the origin (0, 0) in the Cartesian coordinate system in the Euclidean plane.

The point of the unit circle is that it makes other parts of the mathematics easier and neater. For instance, in the unit circle, for any angle θ, the trig values for sine and cosine are clearly nothing more than sin(θ) = y and cos(θ) = x. … Certain angles have “nice” trig values.

The circumfrence of the unit circle is 2π. An arc of the unit circle has the same length as the measure of the central angle that intercepts that arc. Also, because the radius of the unit circle is one, the trigonometric functions sine and cosine have special relevance for the unit circle.