How do you spell refrigerator

How do you spell refrigerator? It’s referred to as a refrigerator. Nonetheless, several people visit it merely as a fridge. Usually, abbreviations prevent the orthography of an extended word. Thus what’s up with the accessorial “d” in the fridge? The historical dictionaries of the English language define fridge as “An informal abbreviation for refrigerator” and claims that the spelling “frig” was inspired by the brand name Frigidaire.

REFRIGERATOR ETYMOLOGY

Artificial refrigeration was 1st incontestable by William Cullen in 1748, and {also the} earliest refrigeration machines developed within the half of the nineteenth century. However, the word icebox is way older; it dates to the first 1600s, and refrigerate, from the Latin verb refrigerate and ultimately from the adjective frigus, which means “cold,” dates to the preceding century.

Fergus also gave the United States of America our adjective frigid. (It should be noted that, as is in step with Latin words, frigus and refrigerate were every pronounced with a strict g—that is, just like the g in good. The shift to a soft-g sound—that is, pronounced just like the g in gesture—in frigid and refrigerated didn’t occur till each word was established in English and at the mercy of French pronunciation influences).

As iceboxes became common in households, it was absolutely natural for a conversational sort of the word refrigerator to drop into the vernacular.

Why is it a Refrigerator and Fridge?

There’s tons of speculation out there. For instance, whereas some American dictionaries describe the “frig” orthography as British, you’d be distressed to seek out a British lexicon that uses such a form. Macmillan, Collins, Longman, and so on the list solely fridge for the short sort of refrigerator.

From The Oxford English Dictionary

The principal historical wordbook of the land language describes refrigerator as “a controversial abbreviation for refrigerator” and says that the “frig” orthography was possibly influenced by the brand Frigidaire.

Refrigerator

Why does the Fridge have a d?

It endeavors to form the writing system to connote the correct pronunciation: frig would rhyme with the rig and be used as a curse. Fringe would have a protracted I sound. Fridge appears like a ridge with an f added, and it rhymes with a ridge. 2. Why doesn’t refrigerate have a d? It comes from Latin refrigerators, and, in Latin, I may be short or long (no one would like for a silent e), and in Latin, g is soft once it comes before an e.

Summary

William Cullen invented the first artificial chiller in 1748, and the first chiller was developed in the mid-19th century, but the word “the refrigerator” is much older; it goes back to the first seventeenth century, and colder from the Latin verb hard rare and finally from the adjective frigus, meaning “cold,” from the previous century. Fergus also gave the United States of America the adjective cold. (It should be noted that like Latin words, frigid and cold are pronounced with a hard g sound, which closely resembles a g sound. Changing to a soft g means that it is pronounced like a g sound.

FRIDGE OR FRIG?

The word we tend to pronounce \frij\ passed off within the twenties as a shortened and altered type of refrigerator, replicating the second language unit phonetically in the longer word, though early uses were spelled frig. Some writers acknowledged the clipped nature of frig or electric refrigerators by orthography it with an apostrophe: luxury one chamber studio simply in-built grounds of a mansion close to likely moor. Fully fit together with dishwasher, waste disposal, preparation bobs, oven, and ‘fridge. — The Times (London), thirteen Apr. 1974

WHY THE D?

Thus, however, did we tend to make the altered orthography? Like several abbreviated forms, it’s terribly doubtless that icebox was widespread in spoken English for an extended time before it absolutely was employed in print with any regularity.

Writers deciding the way to spell the word required a spelling that diagrammatical how the word was pronounced. Merely cutting the word to the letters in its second syllable, frig, was problematic since words ending within the consonant g are pronounced with a hard-g sound: mug, beg, pig, and so on the actual fact is that in English, the terminal \j\ sound, as in \frij, is nearly universally spelled with age.

Once the vowel that immediately precedes the \j\ sound is long, as in period or huge, there’s no d; when the vowel that immediately precedes the \j\ is short, a d is inserted, as in judge, bridge, lodge, and so on it’s common for clipped words to examine new letters introduced into their orthography, as in perk for percolate or spud as a dialectical spelling of potato.

fridge

The short kind frig will still exist as a lesser-used variant spelling of fridge: “there aren’t any bottles of MDMA chilling within the frig or forests of potted herb topiaries germination out of moss. — Richard Buckley, w, 4-11 Apr. 1988” however English already encompasses a verb spelled frig—with one sense which means “to rub or chafe” and another having an additional vulgar connotation.

The preference for icebox offers a path to avoid that potential misinterpretation. Thus before you toss the d out of the fridge, you would possibly need to raise around to examine if it belongs to anyone first. Unless, of course, it smells terrible.

DIFFERENCES IN THE SPELLING OF REFRIGERATOR IN LANGUAGES?

There are differences between British English and American English: however, there are regional differences in British and American dialects. if you see one thing that you just suppose is strange, fridge = fridge/refrigerator

Summary

Merely cutting the word to the letters in its second syllable, frig, was problematic since words ending within the consonant g are pronounced with a hard-g sound: mug, beg, pig, and so on. The actual fact is that in English, the terminal \j\ sound, as in \frij, is nearly universally spelled with age. once the vowel that immediately precedes the \j\ sound is long, as in period or huge, there’s no d; when the vowel that immediately precedes the \j\ is short, a d is inserted, as in judge, bridge, lodge, and so on it’s common for clipped words to examine new letters introduced into their orthography, as in perk for percolate or spud as a dialectical spelling of potato

WHO PLACES THE “D” IN THE “FRIDGE”? IF IT’S SHORT FOR “REFRIGERATOR,” WHY “FRIG”?

  • Most dictionaries list “fridge” because of the solely writing system for this abbreviated version of “refrigerator,” a couple of doing so embody the “d”-more miniature version “frig” as a variant spelling

  • The American’s heritage lexicon of country language (5th ed.), for example, has only the “fridge” spelling, whereas Merriam-webster’s dictionary (11th ed.) includes “frig” as a variant.

  • Some American dictionaries describe the “frig” spelling as British. However, all British people’s dictionaries we’ve checked (Macmillan, Collins, Longman, etc.) list only “fridge” for the short form of “refrigerator.” interestingly, the earliest written example for the term within the English lexicon united states is the “frig” writing system (plus associate apostrophe).

  • In fact, 5 of the eight oxford English dictionary examples spell the term while not the “d” (some with and a few without the apostrophe).

  • Oxford’s primary “frig” citation is from e. fine spanner’s 1926 novel broken trident: “best a part of our stuff here is chilled, and with no’ frig plant working, the mercury can climb sort of a rocket.” however, a reader of the diary has wise us of earlier samples of “frig” and therefore the plural “fringes” as shortened kinds of “refrigerator.”

  • S. Wilding Cole uses each term many times in “the cleansing of a brewery,” a paper bestowed on March 13, 1916, at a gathering in London of the native chapter of the institute of brewing

  • In a very section on the upkeep of refrigerators, for example, Cole says, “most brewers apprehend that unless ‘frig’ and mains are unbroken totally clean, bother is sure to ensue.”

refrigerator

  • The earliest “fridge” cite within the oxford English dictionary is from frame-up, a 1935 crime novel by Collin brooks: “do you mean that you simply keep a body in an icebox looking ahead to the proper moment to bring her out?”

  • The Oxford English dictionary has samples of “frig” from as recently as 1960. Here’s one from the quiet American, the 1955 novel by Graham Greene: “We haven’t a frig—we transmit for ice.”

  • Though “fridge” is either the sole writing system or the {well-liked the popular} one within the eight united states or Britain dictionaries we checked, a touch of googling finds that “frig” isn’t precisely cooling its heels today. Here are simply a couple of the numerous examples denoted over the last year:

  • “Frig not cooling, deep freezer is fine”… “Looking for integral frig with crushed ice/water dispenser”… “Frig not cold associate more. What am I able to do?”… “Freezer works, however, frig not cold”… "freezer semi-cold, frig warm.

  • " An equally spelled verb, “frig,” that most dictionaries describe as vulgar slang, has a lot of to try and do with heating than cooling.

  • However, are these frigging words pronounced? Well, the verb “frig” rhymes with “prig,” but the nouns spelled “frig” and “fridge” each rhyme with “bridge.” and “frigging” rhymes with “digging,” tho’ it’s usually spelled associated with pronounced friggin’.

Refrigerator in the Oxford English Dictionary

  • It describes “fridge” as an informal abbreviation for “refrigerator,” a way older term that showed up within the early 1600s. It suggests that the ‘frig’ writing system might are influenced by the brand “Frigidaire” (a play on “frigid air”).

    Oxford Dictionary

  • "Oxford, a dictionary supported historical evidence, conjointly notes that an 1886 edition of john Russell Bartlett’s Dictionary of Americanisms includes the short type “refrigerator.”

  • We’d add that the corporate currently referred to as Frigidaire was referred to as the guardian refrigerator company once it had been supported in Fort Wayne, i.e., 1916.

  • The corporate adopted the name “Frigidaire” in 1919, 3 years when “frig” and “friges” were utilized in the still paper cited above. Therefore the brand “Frigidaire” might have influenced the usage. However, it couldn’t are the source.

  • We tend to can’t tell from the revealed examples within the oxford English dictionary (or some earlier ones in google books) who originated the “frig” and “fridge” spellings.

  • However, we will speculate regarding why “fridge” has become the dominant spelling. 1st of all, the natural pronunciation of “fridge” matches the method the second linguistic unit sounds in “refrigerator.”

  • Although “frig” is pronounced identical method as “fridge” once it means a refrigerator, the natural pronunciation of “frig” would be like that of the naughty verb we tend to mentioned above.

  • We guess that English speakers typically like the “fridge” writing system; as a result of they instinctively pronounce it the way the letters f-r-i-g sound in “refrigerator.”

Summary

We tend to can’t tell from the revealed examples within the oxford English dictionary (or some earlier ones in google books) who originated the “frig” and “fridge” spellings. 1st of all, the natural pronunciation of “fridge” matches the method the second linguistic unit sounds in “refrigerator.”. However, “frig” is pronounced identical way to “fridge” once it means a refrigerator, the natural pronunciation of “frig” would be like that of the naughty verb we tend to mentioned above. We guess that English speakers typically like the “fridge” writing system; as a result of they instinctively pronounce it the way the letters f-r-i-g sound in “refrigerator.”

Famous Refrigerator’s Brands:

Famous Brands

The following table lists the most famous refrigerator brands in the world:

Brand Name Brand’s Country Headquarter CEO
WHIRPOOL CORPORATION USA MICHIGAN,BENTON CHARTER TOWNSHIP,US MARC BITZER
LG ELECTRONICS SOUTH KOREA DISTRICT SEOUL JO SEAONG-JIN
ELECTROLUX SWEDEN STOCKHOLM JONAS SAMUELSON

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (FAQs)

Peoples have a lot of queries about “How do you spell refrigerator” few of them were discussed below:

1. What is that the correct spelling for the refrigerator?

Correct spelling for English word “refrigerator” is [ɹɪFɹˈɪD͡ƷƏɹˌE͡ɪTƏ], [ɹɪFɹˈɪDƷƏɹˌEɪTƏ], [ɹ_ɪ_F_ɹ_ˈɪ_DƷ_Ə_ɹ_ˌEɪ_T_Ə] (IPA PHONETIC ALPHABET).

2. How does one spell refrigerator within the UK?

Includes “frig” as a variant. Some American dictionaries describe the “frig” orthography as British. However, all nation dictionaries we’ve checked (Macmillan, Collins, Longman, etc.) list solely “fridge” for the short sort of “refrigerator.”

3. Which is the correct fridge or refrigerator?

Fridge, pronounced /frij/, is the shortened refrigerator style showing in print within the early twentieth century.

4. Why is refrigerator spelled without ad?

Since each technology and the jargon was comparatively new, it absolutely was up to those writers to work out its orthography. It’s presumably that the word was modified from “frig” to “refrigerator” to mimic the spelling of similar terms that had identical sounds, admire the bridge, ledge, dodge, fudge, and more.

5. What is the ideal refrigerator temperature?

Maintain a temperature of 40° F (4° C) or below in the refrigerator. The freezer should be set to 0° F (-18° C). Check the temperature on a regular basis. Appliance thermometer are the most accurate and cost-effective technique to determine these temperatures.

6. What do the British call refrigerators?

Refrigerator, pronounced /frij/, is the shortened refrigerator that started showing in print within the early twentieth century.

7. How does one spell refrigerator in the fridge?

Verb (used with object), re·frig·er·at·ed, re·frig·er·at·ing. to create or keep cold or cool, as for preservation.

8. Is it fridge or frig?

Since each the technology and therefore the jargon was comparatively new; it had been up to those writers to see its writing system, and it’s possible that the word was modified from “frig” to “fridge” to mimic the spelling of similar terms that had identical sound, comparable to a bridge, ledge, dodge, and fudge.

9. What is the definition of a refrigerator?

Associate appliance or compartment that is unnaturally unbroken cool and accustomed to store food and drink. Fashionable refrigerators usually build use of the cooling impact.

10. What will the ref stand for?

Ref abbreviation stands for refrigerator. The shorter form of refrigerator, pronounced /FRIJ/, first appeared in print in the early twentieth century.

Conclusion

Refrigerator is frequently used as a fridge. Ordinarily, abbreviations just prevent orthography. So, why is there a “d” in the fridge? The spelling “frig” was influenced by the company name Frigidaire, according to historical dictionaries.

It was William Cullen who constructed the first artificial chiller in 1748, but the name “refrigerator” is considerably older, coming from the Latin verb hard, rare and lastly from the adjective frigus, meaning “cold.” Fergus also gave the USA the term cold. A strong g sound is used to pronounce frigid and chilly, just as Latin terms. The soft g indicates it is pronounced like a g.

We can’t identify who invented the “frig” and “fridge” spellings from the instances in the Oxford English Dictionary (or some earlier ones in Google Books. On top of that, “fridge” is naturalized to sound similar to “refrigerator.” As a refrigerator, “frig” is pronounced similarly to “fridge,” hence the natural pronunciation of “frig” is similar to that of the bad verb. Since English speakers automatically pronounce the letters f-r-i-g in “refrigerator,” we assume they appreciate the “fridge” writing system.

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