Daily average revenue trades (DARTs)

Daily average revenue trades (DARTs),

Definition of Daily average revenue trades (DARTs):

  1. The measurement of the amount of trades a brokerage firm is able to handle on a daily basis. The measurement includes the cost of administrative and commission fees.

  2. Daily Average Revenue Trade (DART) is a metric used in the brokerage industry. DART traditionally represented average trades per day that generated commissions or fees. However, some brokerages expanded the definition of DART to include many commission-free trades as zero commissions became the norm in 2019.

  3. DARTs are monitored by analysts who follow the brokerage industry because they measure how well brokerages are doing in generating revenue from commissions. Commissions were historically a significant source of profits, especially for discount brokerages. Since total profits from commissions are a function of DART, the DART for a brokerage can help to predict quarterly earnings. An increasing DART value suggests that earnings will be higher, while a declining DART metric indicates that earnings may decrease.

How to use Daily average revenue trades (DARTs) in a sentence?

  1. DART traditionally represented average trades per day that generated commissions or fees.
  2. In 2019, E*TRADE decided to expand its definition of DARTs to include all trades that generate payment for order flow, commissions, or fees.
  3. Daily Average Revenue Trade (DART) is a metric used in the brokerage industry.
  4. The trend toward zero-commission trading led brokerages to adopt different definitions of DART, with some maintaining traditional DARTs and others switching to expanded DARTs.

Meaning of Daily average revenue trades (DARTs) & Daily average revenue trades (DARTs) Definition