Blue collar

Blue collar,

Definition of Blue collar:

  1. Relating to manual work or workers, particularly in industry.

  2. The term "blue-collar" refers to a type of employment. Blue-collar jobs are typically classified as involving manual labor and compensation by an hourly wage. Some fields that fall into this category include construction, manufacturing, maintenance, and mining. Those who have this sort of job are characterized as members of the working class.

  3. Refers to employees whose job entails (largely or entirely) physical labor, such as in a factory or workshop. For a piece of work to be termed blue collar, it should be directly related to the output generated by the firm, and its end result should be identifiable or tangible. Historically, in the West, manual workers wore blue shirt collars but clerical workers wore white. See also white collar.

  4. Classifying workers by the color of their shirts dates back to the early 1920s. At the time, many of those in trade occupations (coal miners, masons, bricklayers, boilermakers, welders) who did physical labor in all sorts of temperatures, wore darker colors, which didn't show dirt as readily. It was not unusual to see them wearing boiler suits, chambray shirts, overalls, and jeans all in the color blue.

Synonyms of Blue collar

Manual, Wage, Waged, Industrial, Factory

How to use Blue collar in a sentence?

  1. Blue-collar jobs are considered “working class” jobs, which are typically manual labor and paid hourly.
  2. The world is made up of many workers that spend all day in offices however there is just as many blue collar workers that spend their days outside working with their hands.
  3. For example, nuclear technicians, elevator installers, and subway operators earn over $70,000 per year, which is higher than what the average college graduate earns after graduation. .
  4. Their speech and attitudes mark them as blue-collar guys.
  5. The world is made up of many workers that spend all day in offices however there is just as many blue collar workers that spend their days outside working with their hands.
  6. Today, the term "blue-collar" has evolved, and it's common to find workers in this role who are formally educated, skilled, and highly paid.
  7. Sometimes you may have to take a blue collar job if the economy is down and white collar jobs are hard to find.
  8. The term originated in the 1920s when blue-collar workers—such as those in mining and construction—wore darker color clothes (e.g. jeans, overalls, etc.) to hide dirt. .

Meaning of Blue collar & Blue collar Definition